5G and Edtech?

techlearning

The program will reach an additional five million students by 2023. First, there was sneakernet. Then came the information superhighway. Next up? The Cloud. And now we’re hearing the latest catchphrase for the next great Internet thing—5G. What could this mean for edtech?

This Week’s “Round-Up” Of Useful Posts & Articles On Ed Policy Issues

Larry Ferlazzo

’s school board president wants every district graduate to be eligible for a four-year public university by 2023 [link]. © 2011 CGP Grey , Flickr | CC-BY | via Wylio.

University enrollment decline continues into sixth straight year

The Hechinger Report

No upswing is projected until 2023, and it will be very gradual and comprised increasingly of low-income racial and ethnic minorities who are the first in their families to go to college, the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education estimates.

Consolidation, collaboration or closure? How colleges stay alive in 2018

The Christensen Institute

Most of the best merger and acquisition targets will likely be gone by 2023, as institutions today become proactive in their acquisition efforts. The last year certainly turned in its share of surprises. Prominent full-time MBA and law programs folded. Whole colleges closed, as did well-known bootcamps. Purdue and Kaplan University stunned the higher education world. Strayer and Capella entered into a mega-merger.

How a ‘New’ GI Bill Will Shape Tomorrow’s Education-to-Employment Pipeline

Edsurge

The final report will come out two years later, in 2023. First passed in 1944, the GI Bill transformed U.S. postsecondary education and the course of the nation’s economic development in the late 20th century. Seventy-three years later, the latest revision of the law is poised to mark another turning point for the education and workforce landscape. The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the GI Bill, kicked off a college enrollment boom.

Consolidation, Collaboration or Closure? How Colleges Stay Alive in 2018

Edsurge

Most of the best merger and acquisition targets will likely be gone by 2023, as institutions today become proactive in their acquisition efforts. The last year certainly turned in its share of surprises. Prominent full-time MBA and law programs folded. Whole colleges closed, as did well-known bootcamps. Purdue and Kaplan University stunned the higher education world. Strayer and Capella entered into a mega-merger.

Good news for college applicants: Getting in is easier than they think

The Hechinger Report

The number of high school graduates peaked in 2013, the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education reports , and is projected to remain below that level until at least 2023.

Revolution in Higher Education: chapter 4

Bryan Alexander

Just using a clicker for formative assessment makes a big difference (2023) (paging Derek Bruff !).

MOOC 60

The future of classrooms

Learning with 'e's

by 2023, uses of technologies will change some aspects of teaching and learning but schools and classrooms will be clearly recognizable to students’ parents and grandparents.' This is the fourth blog post in my series on the future of learning and technology.

Older cadets at Air Force Academy are a sign of the times in higher education

The Hechinger Report

Without them, Hansen said, it’s “science fiction” that the state will meet its goal of having 70 percent of its population holding postsecondary credentials by 2023. Monica Callan with first-year cadets who had just endured the Air Force Academy assault course.

Why teacher-authors don’t give everything away free (& neither should you)

The Cornerstone Blog

At that rate, the club materials might have gotten finished by 2023, if ever, and the quality and support would be lacking because I highly doubt I could convince a team of other people to help me for free.

Universities and colleges struggle to stem big drops in enrollment

The Hechinger Report

There’s no upswing likely until 2023, and even then the recovery will be slow, projects the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. There are 2.4