How Community Coalitions Are Bridging the Digital Divide

Digital Promise

Across the country, local networks known as Education Innovation Clusters (EdClusters) are bringing together partners and resources to meet urgent needs and envision a new future for teaching and learning. Tackling the Digital Divide with Device Deployment in Kansas City.

Why I’m optimistic about bridging the digital divide

eSchool News

While administrators have gone above and beyond to address students’, parents’ and teachers’ needs when schools shifted to remote learning, it has become clear that districts were not prepared to deliver solutions that would ensure every student could embrace remote and online learning.

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Fall Semester is Here. Now What?

Kajeet

Digital Learning Digital Divide WiFi for Students distance learning Higher Education Online Learning Hybrid Learning

Here’s How Colleges Should Help Close the Digital Divide in the COVID-Era

Edsurge

One key problem prevalent in many low-socioeconomic communities around the nation—like San Antonio, which now has the highest poverty rate of the country's 25 largest metro areas —is the digital divide. Digital divide is a term used to describe the gap present in society between those who have access to the internet and technology and those who don’t. Together we can close the gap on the digital divide.

Moving a Summer Program to the Virtual World — While Closing the Digital Divide

Edsurge

As the pandemic unfolded, our team at SMASH, a nationwide summer residential program for STEM education serving students of color, had to move an established, 17-year program into a virtual learning environment. Along the way, we focused on five areas that we felt were necessary to serve our community of young people: Mitigate the Digital and Connectivity Divide Access to computers and a dependable internet connection is critical to delivering any form of online learning.

Digital divide hits small towns hard

eSchool News

In New Mexico, educators and policymakers are working to close the digital opportunity gap. Unfortunately, the digital divide is a very real barrier to success in our community,” said Audra Bluehouse, an English teacher at Hatch Valley High. “We Others spend long hours studying in the computer labs at the Doña Ana Community College Hatch Learning Center, adjacent to the high school. Next page: What policymakers are doing to close the digital divide.

Hundreds of thousands of students still can’t access online learning

The Hechinger Report

After schools switched from physical instruction to remote learning in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, districts and state leaders assured families they would get devices for students and the technology resources needed to do schoolwork at home. But more than two months after the switch to distance learning, many students still don’t have what they need. Karen Cator, CEO of the nonprofit Digital Promise.

Innovating Beyond Avoidable K-12 Crises

EdNews Daily

the digital divide, lack of access in rural areas, weather-related disruptions, overcrowded classrooms, understaffed school buildings, bullying, and many more. Online learning is a quarter century old. Featured How Learning Works Technology

OPINION: U.S. public schools should be federally funded

The Hechinger Report

The endless Covid-19 crisis is revealing the primary weakness of decentralizing the funding of public services: Stark resource divides that fuel some of the deepest social inequities. As a result, when the pandemic hit , the district had a relatively smooth pivot to distance-learning. Philadelphia’s schools, meanwhile, struggled mightily to close digital divides that prevented them from quickly launching distance-instruction. “It’s

Chaos Learning: Classroom vs Online?

My Island View

If this pandemic has taught me anything, this would be my lesson learned. Why not transition the entire system to remote learning? Let’s mandate remote learning. Administrators will lead remotely, teachers will teach remotely, students will learn remotely. Although we have talked a great deal about remote learning over the last decade, we haven’t really taught teachers to do it. As educators we have also learned that Maslow truly comes before Bloom in learning.

Ready or not, a new era of homeschooling has begun

The Hechinger Report

The suburban Seattle school is part of the Northshore School District, which closed earlier in March and has since paused its online learning program. (AP For others, it’s an even bigger catastrophe: they may not be able to afford proper meals for their children, much less the technology and connectivity needed for online learning. For some children hastily thrust into this new way of learning, school offers far more stability and predictability than their home lives.

Coronavirus is the practice run for schools. But soon comes climate change

The Hechinger Report

His schools have been scrambling to set up online learning, connect students with virtual counseling and get laptops into the hands of families — steps McKneely says will be invaluable if another hurricane disrupts education. “We We report on how climate change emergencies are disrupting student learning, exacerbating mental health problems , devastating school infrastructure , and how the coronavirus pandemic is a preview of what education looks like in a climate emergency.

Teachers use high and low-tech means to reach English Language Learners during coronavirus crisis

The Hechinger Report

Administrators at Dorchester School District Two in suburban Summerville, South Carolina, were well aware of the digital divide when they decided to give students both paper and online resources after shuttering schools because of coronavirus. She’s used Facebook and text messaging to keep in touch with her eighth graders as the district builds online resources and begins to distribute devices to those who need them.

Every student needs summer school this year to combat coronavirus learning loss

The Hechinger Report

As the coronavirus closes schools, online platforms are proving to be invaluable, allowing instruction to continue and alleviating the severity of students’ learning loss. To make up for probable academic gaps produced during this unprecedented period, districts should continue providing academic services online in the summer. More recent studies show that the summer is a pivotal period for student learning. But, for all kids, summer learning loss is a setback.

Counseling kids during the coronavirus: A tough job made even tougher

The Hechinger Report

A century ago, counselors didn’t spend much of their time on the mental health of students, or what’s known in schools as social-emotional learning. The digital divide raised similar concerns: If no phone numbers work for a family, if emails remain unanswered, how can counselors gauge the welfare of a child? “It’s Coronavirus and Education Guidance Gap K-12 News Hechinger West Mental health and trauma online learning Rural schools Social emotional

Where’s the Silver Lining for Education?

My Island View

Schools across the nation closed their doors, but required their teachers to try to carry on educating their students using online technology. Overnight, discussions, which were in many cases theoretical about online teaching and learning, became a reality. The earliest indications of our preparedness to meet the online challenge to educators underscored the gap that exists in professional development for educators. The digital divide must be addressed.

Coronavirus accelerates higher education’s trend toward distance learning

The Hechinger Report

Earlier this month, California State University, Fullerton, asked its faculty to prepare for teaching all their fall classes online. If it does go that way, CSU-Fullerton would benefit from the fact that it already offers a significant amount of online coursework. Even before the crisis, 35 percent of students took one or more classes online. A history with online education made this spring’s transition easier for some schools.

AI can disrupt racial inequity in schools, or make it much worse

The Hechinger Report

From driver-assisted car systems to video games and virtual assistants like Alexa and Siri, artificial intelligence (AI) has transformed almost every aspect of our lives, as our machines learn from the massive amounts of data we provide them. Current attempts to introduce AI in schools have led to improvements in assessing students’ prior and ongoing learning, placing students in appropriate subject levels, scheduling classes and individualizing instruction.

FCC changes its rules, puts educational spectrum up for open auction

The Hechinger Report

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. Sign up for the Future of Learning newsletter. Future of Learning. Mississippi Learning. Related: Will a new push for free wireless internet help rural students get online?

How Educators Can Empower Students Through Technology

Ask a Tech Teacher

I mean the basics of how to use the tech tools that are driving learning. Dr. Paul Perry, former teacher, administrator, and nonprofit exec, has put together a brief guide for educators looking to expand learning opportunities for students using technology. Address the digital divide.

A Tiny Microbe Upends Decades of Learning

The Hechinger Report

Almost no district was truly ready to plunge into remote learning full time and with no end in sight. There is no one-size-fits-all remedy and no must-have suite of digital learning tools. As the struggle continues, a few overarching lessons learned — about equity, expectations and communication — are now helping schools navigate this crisis on the fly. But America’s persistent digital divide has greatly hampered efforts toward this goal.

COVID-19: Creating a new education reality

eSchool News

And with that, so did the shift from in-school instruction to online learning, which brought to light very complicated issues and inequities. The onset of remote learning has magnified the disparity between students who have access to computers and internet and those who do not. The digital divide in our communities, particularly among children from underrepresented and low socioeconomic communities, raises questions that need to be answered.

MLTI is not a Tech Buy or Commodity. It’s a Learning Initiative.

More Verbs

The Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI) has been around since 2001, providing 7th & 8th Grade students and teachers with devices and more. Recently a new piece of “Concept Draft” legislation popped up: LD 137: An Act To Make the Maine Learning Technology Initiative More Cost-effective. I have been involved in learning through technology initiatives for more than 20 years. MLTI has always been about learning. But there are two digital divides.

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

The floor-to-ceiling glass wall between the high-tech fabrication lab and the hallway at Monticello High School in Albemarle County, Virginia, is meant to showcase the hands-on, self-directed learning done there. “I But Bredder can’t give students the tool he considers most indispensable to 21st-century learning — broadband internet beyond school walls. Related: Not all towns are created equal, digitally. Sign up for our Blended Learning newsletter.

Remote Learning Is Not Going Away Soon. This Is How to Make It Better.

Edsurge

Clearly, remote learning is here to stay, at least for the next few months. In recognition of that reality, a new report has outlined “10 ways to make online learning work,” covering a range of best practices.

Responding to COVID-19: How Are the Children?

Digital Promise

and Puerto Rico have closed all public schools, with few teachers prepared to move to a virtual learning environment and even fewer parents ready to homeschool their children. At this unprecedented moment, it is crucial for parents/caregivers and teachers to work together on a plan for students to continue their learning experiences at home. And, what do teachers need to help them develop remote learning plans, while still attending to the social and emotional needs of each student?

School’s Out: A COVID-19 Lesson

EdTech Magazine

Before the pandemic, we knew there was a digital divide in America. The need to close the divide can no longer be ignored because students of all ages are locked out from school – not just because of the virus itself, but from lack of an internet connection at home. But for many, the issue was abstract, unimaginable or simply not their problem. Enter COVID-19.

School’s Out: A COVID-19 Lesson

EdTech Magazine

Before the pandemic, we knew there was a digital divide in America. The need to close the divide can no longer be ignored because students of all ages are locked out from school – not just because of the virus itself, but from lack of an internet connection at home. But for many, the issue was abstract, unimaginable or simply not their problem. Enter COVID-19.

School’s Out: A COVID-19 Lesson

EdTech Magazine

Before the pandemic, we knew there was a digital divide in America. The need to close the divide can no longer be ignored because students of all ages are locked out from school – not just because of the virus itself, but from lack of an internet connection at home. But for many, the issue was abstract, unimaginable or simply not their problem. Enter COVID-19.

How K–12 IT Leaders Can Support Digital Equity

EdTech Magazine

Bridging the digital divide is more critical than ever. When schools across the country made the quick shift to emergency remote learning during the pandemic, many found that it exposed deficits and exacerbated existing challenges around internet access, especially in rural and high-poverty areas. MASD realized that some students — and even teachers — did not have at-home internet connections to use devices for online learning.

How K–12 IT Leaders Can Support Digital Equity

EdTech Magazine

Bridging the digital divide is more critical than ever. When schools across the country made the quick shift to emergency remote learning during the pandemic, many found that it exposed deficits and exacerbated existing challenges around internet access, especially in rural and high-poverty areas. MASD realized that some students — and even teachers — did not have at-home internet connections to use devices for online learning.

How K?12 IT Leaders Can Support Digital Equity

EdTech Magazine

Bridging the digital divide is more critical than ever. When schools across the country made the quick shift to emergency remote learning during the pandemic, many found that it exposed deficits and exacerbated existing challenges around internet access, especially in rural and high-poverty areas. MASD realized that some students — and even teachers — did not have at-home internet connections to use devices for online learning.

How K–12 IT Leaders Can Support Digital Equity

EdTech Magazine

Bridging the digital divide is more critical than ever. When schools across the country made the quick shift to emergency remote learning during the pandemic, many found that it exposed deficits and exacerbated existing challenges around internet access, especially in rural and high-poverty areas. MASD realized that some students — and even teachers — did not have at-home internet connections to use devices for online learning.

How K–12 IT Leaders Can Support Digital Equity

EdTech Magazine

Bridging the digital divide is more critical than ever. When schools across the country made the quick shift to emergency remote learning during the pandemic, many found that it exposed deficits and exacerbated existing challenges around internet access, especially in rural and high-poverty areas. MASD realized that some students — and even teachers — did not have at-home internet connections to use devices for online learning.

From normal to better: Using what we’ve learned to improve education

Neo LMS

Since the beginning of the school shutdowns, there have been debates about the effectiveness of online learning. As we embark on a new school year, whether it will be online, in person, or a hybrid of both, we can focus on these areas for lasting improvement.