The future of classrooms

Learning with 'e's

This is due to the rapid proliferation of mobile technology, the disintermediation of traditional teacher and student roles, new trends such as MOOCs and the upsurge of user generated content on social media sites - all of which take learning away from previously familiar territory. Cuban is very sceptical of online courses, and presumably his sceptiscism also embraces MOOCs. This is the fourth blog post in my series on the future of learning and technology.

Good analysis of higher ed trends and strategy: Jon McGee’s _Breakpoint_

Bryan Alexander

That population is increasingly nonwhite: “By 2023, graduates of color will represent nearly half of all high school graduates… up from one-third in 2003.” ” (36) Specifically the largest increases will come from Asian and Latino populations (“By 2023, Hispanic graduates are expected to make up one quarter of all high school graduates”).

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Good analysis of higher ed trends and strategy: Jon McGee’s _Breakpoint_

Bryan Alexander

That population is increasingly nonwhite: “By 2023, graduates of color will represent nearly half of all high school graduates… up from one-third in 2003.” ” (36) Specifically the largest increases will come from Asian and Latino populations (“By 2023, Hispanic graduates are expected to make up one quarter of all high school graduates”).

Revolution in Higher Education: chapter 4

Bryan Alexander

” Here DeMillo changes tack from neuroscience (chapter 3) and returns to technology, but not very much to MOOCs. Just using a clicker for formative assessment makes a big difference (2023) (paging Derek Bruff !). Continuing with our reading of Richard DeMillo’s Revolution in Higher Education: How a Small Band of Innovators Will Make College Accessible and Affordable (2015) ( publisher ; Amazon ): this week we’re discussing chapter 4, “Technology Curves.”

MOOC 47

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

billion by 2023. In 2013, on the heels of “the Year of the MOOC,” Barber released a report titled “An Avalanche is Coming,” calling for the “unbundling” of higher education. MOOCs are, no surprise, their own entry on this long list of awfulness.