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How Librarians Continue Their Work Digitally Even as Coronavirus Closes Libraries

Edsurge

Libraries are temporarily closing their doors due to coronavirus—like so many other institutions in the wake of a growing pandemic. And like schools and colleges, they are trying to move operations online as much as they can. But what does it mean for librarians to serve patrons without a library ? EdSurge: You are somebody who has been embracing the digital for a long time. And for a lot of libraries, that's not something you can do on a dime.

How Libraries Stretch Their Capabilities to Serve Kids During a Pandemic

MindShift

Hunter and her colleague Rachel Krumenacker at the Chattanooga Public Library in Chattanooga, Tennessee, had filmed the DIY craft on a Zoom call from their respective living rooms. The craft videos are part of the Chattanooga Public Libraries’ summer program for kids, called Make.

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Every student needs summer school this year to combat coronavirus learning loss

The Hechinger Report

Rising fourth graders listen as a teacher reads a book at an elementary school summer program in Silver Spring, MD. As the coronavirus closes schools, online platforms are proving to be invaluable, allowing instruction to continue and alleviating the severity of students’ learning loss. To make up for probable academic gaps produced during this unprecedented period, districts should continue providing academic services online in the summer.

A Tiny Microbe Upends Decades of Learning

The Hechinger Report

Almost no district was truly ready to plunge into remote learning full time and with no end in sight. There is no one-size-fits-all remedy and no must-have suite of digital learning tools. As the struggle continues, a few overarching lessons learned — about equity, expectations and communication — are now helping schools navigate this crisis on the fly. But America’s persistent digital divide has greatly hampered efforts toward this goal.

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

The floor-to-ceiling glass wall between the high-tech fabrication lab and the hallway at Monticello High School in Albemarle County, Virginia, is meant to showcase the hands-on, self-directed learning done there. “I But Bredder can’t give students the tool he considers most indispensable to 21st-century learning — broadband internet beyond school walls. Related: Not all towns are created equal, digitally. Sign up for our Blended Learning newsletter.

A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 28 & 29 Editions)

Doug Levin

Since the last edition of a ‘Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News”: I’ve joined efforts to support Net Neutrality protections ; Written further about the prediction made in the book, “Disrupting Class.” ” that by 2019 half of all high school classes will be taught over the internet ; Raised questions about a new study on personalized learning ; Added four new incidents to the K-12 cyber incident map ; and. Summer.

EdTech 150

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

Online Education (The Once and Future “MOOC”). “In the Leeds offering, for example, each course certificate will cost £59 and there are five taught courses; the sixth assessment course, which leads to 10 credits, is priced at £250 – making a total cost of £545 – which will also cover access to online library content,” The Guardian reports. (It’ll Accelerate Learning has raised $10 million from Owl Ventures. Education Politics.

MOOC 46

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

Via WaPo : “The FCC talks the talk on the digital divide – and then walks in the other direction.” ” Online Education and the Once and Future “MOOC” “Should Online Courses Go Through ‘Beta Testing’?” Via Inside Higher Ed : “ FutureLearn , the massive open online course provider owned by the Open University in the U.K., ” “What’s the bottom line on online preschool ?”

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

The implication, according to one NYT article : “the digital gap between rich and poor kids is not what we expected.” The real digital divide, this article contends, is not that affluent children have access to better and faster technologies. (Um, Affluent students get to digital tools for creative exploration; poor students get to use theirs for test prep. Boundless’s materials have been archived by David Wiley’s company Lumen Learning. Online Grade Portals.