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It’s 2020: Have Digital Learning Innovations Trends Changed?

Edsurge

In early 2017, organizations that have focused on digital learning came together to better leverage their strengths and capacities for a common goal: improving student success.

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ACT Bets Big on Analytics, Adaptive Learning With $7.5M Investment in Smart Sparrow

Edsurge

In recent years, the nonprofit has invested in several education technology efforts around learning analytics and adaptive learning. million investment in Smart Sparrow , a company that offers a platform used by many higher-ed faculty members and instructors to develop online, adaptive courses and simulations. Roorda wants the ACT to become more involved in the learning process, and provide more analytics solutions to teachers and students.

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Hoping to Spur 'Learning Engineering,' Carnegie Mellon Will Open-Source Its Digital-Learning Software

Edsurge

In an unusual move intended to shake up how college teaching is done around the world, Carnegie Mellon University today announced that it will give away dozens of the digital-learning software tools it has built over more than a decade—and make their underlying code available for anyone to see and modify. The goal of the software giveaway is to jump-start “learning engineering,” the practice of applying findings from learning science to college classrooms.

Digital Learning’s Pioneers Are Cautiously Optimistic

Edsurge

It represents a category of edtech, called “digital courseware” by foundations and industry analysts, that’s changing the way online students learn and faculty teach. Students receive individual feedback on their progress and their learning experiences change based on their performance. These neatly packaged courses also raise questions about the role of faculty, and who decides what students need to learn. Education Technology Higher Education Postsecondary Learning

‘Our Technology Is Our Ideology’: George Siemens on the Future of Digital Learning

Edsurge

What does it mean to be human in a digital age? A researcher, theorist, educator, Siemens is the digital learning guy. He’s credited with co-teaching the first MOOC in 2008, introduced the theory of “connectivism”—the idea that knowledge is distributed across digital networks—and spearheaded research projects about the role of data and analytics in education. Rise of the robots Siemens has both an academic and an industry perspective on digital learning.

The Winners and Filmstrips of An (Almost) Decade in Education Technology

Edsurge

Marie Cini is the president of the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning. I define education technology as any tool that supports learning, digital or not. But today, edtech is commonly understood to mean digital technology. Learning analytics.

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Trends to watch in 2015: education and technology

Bryan Alexander

Online learning, or the teaching formerly knows as “distance learning” Will this keep growing? Skepticism about the quality of online learning could migrate to the general population. We still see the majority of campuses failing to formally recognize professors’ digital work. Yet we also see academic deans and provosts showing more interest in digital learning than their faculty.

Education Technology and the Power of Platforms

Hack Education

I have learned so much in the intervening years, and my analysis then strikes me as incredibly naive and shallow. million in venture capital from high profile names like LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and from firms active in ed-tech investing such as Learn Capital. platforms are digital infrastructures that enable two or more groups to interact. Arguably, one of the best candidates is the learning management system.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

The implication, according to one NYT article : “the digital gap between rich and poor kids is not what we expected.” The real digital divide, this article contends, is not that affluent children have access to better and faster technologies. (Um,