Remove Accessibility Remove Dropout Remove Elementary Remove Student Engagement

Will the students who didn’t show up for online class this spring go missing forever?

The Hechinger Report

Monica Williams remembers the late May day she and first grade teacher Lizette Gutierrez reconnected with the four young siblings from Cable Elementary. No teachers from the San Antonio elementary had heard from the children since schools closed abruptly in March due to the pandemic.

At this one-of-a-kind Boston public high school, students learn calculus in Spanish

The Hechinger Report

Students participate in morning workshops in advance of national May 1 “Day Without Immigrants” rallies, learning also about the labor rights history of May Day rallies worldwide. At the time, Hispanic students were both the most likely to drop out of the city’s schools and the least likely to enroll in college when compared to black, white and Asian students. Perhaps not surprisingly, these students drop out at higher rates than any other major subgroup.

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Why educators are moving away from the Station Rotation model

The Christensen Institute

The Station Rotation has consistently reigned as the most popular blended-learning model implemented by elementary schools. Of the 235 active elementary schools currently profiled in the BLU school directory , 136, or 58 percent, of them have a Station Rotation program. Many educators, particularly at the elementary school level, have rotated students among centers or stations for decades. The Station Rotation may fail to promote student agency.

Erasing the Look and Feel of Poverty

Digital Promise

The majority of K-12 students in the U.S. For these students, poverty brings a host of other disadvantages, most beyond the school district’s control: broken homes, transient living situations, and a lack of educational support at home. Between 30 and 40 percent of students enter kindergarten not ready for school. Once they start their education, those students have a wider variety of social and emotional needs and receive less educational enrichment outside of school.

Erasing the Look and Feel of Poverty

Digital Promise

The majority of K-12 students in the U.S. For these students, poverty brings a host of other disadvantages, most beyond the school district’s control: broken homes, transient living situations, and a lack of educational support at home. Between 30 and 40 percent of students enter kindergarten not ready for school. Once they start their education, those students have a wider variety of social and emotional needs and receive less educational enrichment outside of school.

5 Radical Schooling Ideas For An Uncertain Fall And Beyond

MindShift

But access to home support is arguably even more important. A national survey by the advocacy group ParentsTogether found big gaps by income in the ability to access emergency learning. “Never in the modern history of our education system has the importance of family engagement been more apparent,” says Alejandro Gibes de Gac, the founder of Springboard Collaborative. “The first week that we did virtual education, we missed 350 students,” Mathews says.