Reducing Friction in OER Adoption

Iterating Toward Openness

Last week I promised I would write a few posts about reducing friction with regard to OER. In last week’s post I talked about how we’re making it ridiculously easy for students, faculty, and others to contribute to the maintenance and improvement of OER.

OER 101

A true gift from SHEG: DIY digital literacy assessments and tools for historical thinking

NeverEndingSearch

SHEG currently offers three impressive curricula that may be put to immediate use in secondary classrooms and libraries. You may remember Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) for its groundbreaking and utterly depressing report, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Online Civic Reasoning. In the November 2016 Executive Summary , the researchers shared: When thousands of students respond to dozens of tasks there are endless variations.

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Can Technology in the Classroom Replace Expensive Textbooks

Kitaboo on EdTech

But these are secondary causes. As per the latest annual survey of state spending by the State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO), state spending per student has declined at public colleges and universities by around 8%. Now post-secondary tuition fee provides more revenue than public appropriations. Although rentals are a good option approved by educational institutes, OER is yet to be widely accepted by educational institutes.

OER 67

Forgetting Our History: From the Reusability Paradox to the Remix Hypothesis

Iterating Toward Openness

No one wants to trade efficacy for reusability (or for lower cost, or for anything else – as the recent Babson survey showed , faculty want proven efficacy more than anything else). OER make it possible for us to contextualize our resources and customize our pedagogies to support more effective learning, but they don’t do the work for us. Wow, there’s been some great writing lately.

OER 130

Colleges Are Striking Bulk Deals With Textbook Publishers. Critics Say There Are Many Downsides.

Edsurge

And of course there are other vendors, like Elsevier and Wiley (like Jones Soda and RC) and openly-licensed resources known as OER, or open education resources (which are something like a Sodastream homebrew). And there's the fact that surveys show many students still prefer printed textbooks to digital ones. That’s one argument made by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, or SPARC, which advocates for lower textbook costs and OER.

Storms over liberal education: notes on the 2016 AAC&U conference

Bryan Alexander

I kicked things off with a survey of major technological developments in a very top level way, then dived into specific, currently used digital tools (the LMS, ePortfolios, video, robotics, big data, social media, 3d printing, etc.). Discussion went in some interesting angles, such as secondary education. One person thought shifting tertiary school content down to secondary could help reduce adjunctification, by (I think) reducing teaching hours in colleges.

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

The NAACP endorses OER. For what it’s worth, according to the latest data from the NCES , the number of post-secondary institutions in the US has increased since 2011. Via The Cambridge Student : “National student boycott invalidates National Student Survey data.” ” I learned during my recent trip to the UK that the National Student Survey is a Very Big Deal, and by the sounds of it, its invalidation might be Very Good News. Education Politics.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

At the time, David Wiley expressed his concern that the lawsuit could jeopardize the larger OER movement, if nothing else, by associating open educational materials with piracy.