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Digital Divide 2.0: a few facts and figures

Neo LMS

Today we launch right in with a topic that is on the minds and hearts of many teachers – the “digital divide”; that silent, pernicious socioeconomic gap between students that have and students that do not have access to technology. Digital divide: facts and figures.

Technology overuse may be the new digital divide

The Hechinger Report

2017 Common Sense Census: media use by kids age zero to eight. For years policymakers have fretted about the “digital divide,” that poor students are less likely to have computers and high-speed internet at home than rich students.

A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition)

Doug Levin

Questions that have been a long time coming… Otherwise, here’s what caught my eye this week – news, tools, and reports about education, public policy, technology, and innovation – including a little bit about why. A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition).

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A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition)

Doug Levin

Questions that have been a long time coming… Otherwise, here’s what caught my eye this week – news, tools, and reports about education, public policy, technology, and innovation – including a little bit about why. A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition).

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New Survey Reveals How Much Time Kids Really Spend on Mobile Devices

Edsurge

kids live in a house with some form of a mobile device—and those smartphones and tablets are gobbling up a greater portion of kids' screen time than ever. That’s one of the key findings in a just-released Common Sense Media survey tracking media habits among children aged 0-8, which also found a narrowing but significant digital divide among lower-income households, and the first signs that virtual reality and internet-connected toys are finding their way into American homes.

Vote for Digital Promise’s SXSW and SXSW EDU 2018 Session Ideas

Digital Promise

Every day at Digital Promise, we work with leading educators, researchers, and developers across the country to help close the Digital Learning Gap and improve learning for all. Through this work, we see powerful examples of innovation across education — from students creating their own virtual reality (VR) films, to researchers working with technology developers to improve edtech efficacy, to educators rethinking their own professional development with the use of micro-credentials.

A hidden, public internet asset that could get more kids online for learning

The Hechinger Report

Leverenz and other critics have singled out two educational nonprofits — Mobile Beacon and Mobile Citizen — both of which rake in millions of dollars a year from their national holdings of EBS licenses, while using just a fraction of the revenue to supply much-needed broadband access to students.

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

In places like Albemarle County, where school officials estimate up to 20 percent of students lack home broadband, all the latest education-technology tools meant to narrow opportunity and achievement gaps can widen them instead. Related: Not all towns are created equal, digitally.

Not all towns are created equal, digitally

The Hechinger Report

And their cash-strapped school district has struggled to provide them with even the most basic digital tools. million into schoolwide technology upgrades. It’s about helping students with limited tech skills be prepared for a global economy that is becoming increasingly digitized.

Young Children Are Spending Much More Time In Front Of Small Screens

MindShift

The nationally representative parent survey found that 98 percent of homes with children now have a mobile device — such as a tablet or smartphone. Mobile devices are now just as common as televisions in family homes. The growth of mobile is a dramatic change.

Stunning: Research shows intense spike in children’s media use

eSchool News

The research from Common Sense, which examines media use by kids ages 0-8 and is the third installment in an ongoing series that tracks media and technology use, also uncovered an increase in the amount of time children spend with mobile devices–48 minutes, up from just five minutes in 2011.

Learn how this state is expanding off-campus connectivity for students

eSchool News

Challenges surrounding technology access remain significant obstacles today, and states often struggle to help students find internet connectivity outside of school. Too many Minnesota students are on the wrong side of the digital divide.

4 Examples of the best digital access initiatives

Neo LMS

The gap in digital equity must be put under the spotlight if schools are going to be able to redress, and address, the yawning “homework” gap. 4 Examples of the best digital access initiatives. The Digital Equity Initiative. Mobile Beacon.

What New Research on Young Kids’ Media Use Means for Teachers

Graphite Blog

Mobile Access Is Nearly Universal Perhaps it’s no surprise to learn that mobile device use has become nearly universal, with 98 percent of kids age 8 and under living in a home with some type of mobile device. In addition, the amount of time young kids spend on mobile devices has tripled since 2013 -- from 15 minutes a day to 48 minutes a day, a close second to the 58 minutes a day kids spend watching TV. Introduce digital citizenship skills early.

The changing geography of work: a new report

Bryan Alexander

McKinsey just published a new report, “The future of work in America: People and places, today and tomorrow” ( summary ; longer document ), looking ahead to 2030 after new technologies have had some impact. percent did so in 2017. economics education and technology futures

Will a new batch of licenses help rural students get online?

The Hechinger Report

Shawn Caine, who teaches technology at Panguitch High School in Garfield County, Utah, lets students who don’t have adequate home internet service get online in her classroom before and after school. Tom Rolfes, education IT manager for the Nebraska Information Technology Commission.

Making Sense of the Common Sense Census

Gaggle Speaks

We were talking about how Gaggle and Common Sense Education could work together to draw attention to the need to teach Digital Citizenship and further protect students when they use school- or district-provided technology.

State Leadership Working Towards Broadband Access for All

edWeb.net

After all, schools are preparing them for their future careers, which will include using some aspect of online technology. They collaborate to make sure the technology and services are meeting their current and future needs.

Are educational videos leaving low-income students behind?

The Hechinger Report

One 2017 survey found that children under age 8 are spending 48 minutes on mobile devices a day in addition to two hours of television. Related: Technology overuse may be the new digital divide.

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