Remove 2011 Remove Digital Divide Remove Mobility Remove Technology

Digital Divide = Educational Divide = Urgent Action Needed

Tomorrow's Learners

Digital Native is a common term used to describe those who have been brought up during the digital age of technology, and are therefore more familiar with computers and the Internet. Technology is in fact changing the way we view schools, teaching and learning.

The elephant in the room

Learning with 'e's

Far too many futurologists, authors and commentators are ignoring the issue of the digital divide. Several books I have read recently on new and emerging technologies provide a healthy balance. They eulogise about the benefits, and are circumspect about the dangers of technology.

New Survey Reveals How Much Time Kids Really Spend on Mobile Devices

Edsurge

kids live in a house with some form of a mobile device—and those smartphones and tablets are gobbling up a greater portion of kids' screen time than ever. That’s one of the key findings in a just-released Common Sense Media survey tracking media habits among children aged 0-8, which also found a narrowing but significant digital divide among lower-income households, and the first signs that virtual reality and internet-connected toys are finding their way into American homes.

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Shaping the future

Learning with 'e's

Some would suspect this is a reference to the digital divide, the haves and have nots in our society. We know what technologies we can use to create excellent learning opportunities for the students in our care. Technology education RSCON3 learning future

Stunning: Research shows intense spike in children’s media use

eSchool News

New research has unearthed a dramatic increase in the number of young children who have their own tablet device–42 percent compared to 1 percent in 2011. Next page: Has the digital divide between high- and low-income families closed?).

Young Children Are Spending Much More Time In Front Of Small Screens

MindShift

The nationally representative parent survey found that 98 percent of homes with children now have a mobile device — such as a tablet or smartphone. Mobile devices are now just as common as televisions in family homes. The growth of mobile is a dramatic change.

Distraction 2 Reaction: BYOT (BYOD) Success!

EdTechSandyK

Notes from TCEA 2012 Presentation by Eanes ISD Tech Group and Carl Hooker, Director of Instructional Technology, Eanes ISD Presentation posted at: edtech.eanesisd.net/tcea Research Behind BYOT 2011 Horizon Report K12 Edition - Published every year. Publicizes key trends and challenges and predictions for adoption educational technology. Support of the technologies we use are becoming more cloud based than server based. have a mobile phone.

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No Teacher is an Island – Mary-Joyce Arekion, Mauritius

Daily Edventures

But by weaving technology into her teaching, Arekion is bringing the unfamiliar to her students in living color. “We Technology has played a key role in Arekion’s own learning. I was enthralled by what I saw educators do with technology. In 2011, Arekion became an MIEE national winner with her project “Bridging Digital Divide,” and she continues to seek the best ways to engage her students in 21 st century learning.

What New Research on Young Kids’ Media Use Means for Teachers

Graphite Blog

The newest wave of the Common Sense Census: Media Use by Kids Age Zero to Eight (also conducted in 2011 and 2013) shines a spotlight on the increasing presence that devices and media have in young kids’ lives. Mobile Access Is Nearly Universal Perhaps it’s no surprise to learn that mobile device use has become nearly universal, with 98 percent of kids age 8 and under living in a home with some type of mobile device.