Massachusetts is taking action to improve the digital divide in classrooms across the state

Education Superhighway

One year ago we launched the Massachusetts Digital Connections Initiative in partnership with Governor Baker’s Office, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE), and MassIT.

Another Cause of Inequality: Slow Internet in Schools

Educator Innovator

Using digital tools in the classroom isn’t the future of learning, it’s the present—except at the significant percentage of schools without reliable high-speed internet. Along with the increase in speed, there’s been an exponential increase in the use of digital tools in the classroom.

Nearly all American classrooms can now connect to high-speed internet, effectively closing the “connectivity divide”

The Hechinger Report

The nonprofit launched in 2012, and when it explored school connectivity data the following year, it found that just 30 percent of school districts had sufficient bandwidth to support digital learning, or 100 kbps per student.

Most districts are doing nothing about the homework gap; a few are making a big difference

eSchool News

billion increase in E-rate funding over the last 18 months. This issue constitutes a new civil right; the right to digital equity; the right to connect to needed resources — anywhere, anytime. 3 out of 4 districts have little plan for providing off-campus internet.

Report: 41 percent of schools are under-connected

eSchool News

This kind of connectivity is necessary, the authors note, to help connect students to high-quality digital learning opportunities. It also highlights state leaders who have helped their states put these digital learning opportunities directly in front of teachers and students.

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

But a few pioneering districts have shown that it’s possible, and Albemarle County has joined a nascent trend of districts trying to build their own bridges across the digital divide. Related: Not all towns are created equal, digitally. Read more about the Digital Divide.