With Adaptive Tech, Students Are Saving Money and Learning More

Edsurge

Community colleges are known for innovating to meet the challenges of educating some of the nation’s most disadvantaged students: low-income, first-generation, minority, and adult learners. adaptive technology. These digital tools help students master course learning goals by using data generated from students’ interactions with the adaptive software to predict what students should view or do next online.

Why new technologies often don’t help students

The Christensen Institute

Edtech enthusiasts promote the benefits of innovations such as open educational resources (OER), learning management systems (LMS), and adaptive learning software. But when education leaders use these technologies merely as replacements for textbooks, gradebooks, and worksheets, they risk complicating teachers’ jobs with only marginal gains for students. The Gooru software and LPS’s learning resources are available for free at gooru.org.

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Can US Higher Education Publishers Leverage a Subscription Model

Kitaboo on EdTech

Educational publishers, who till now had a steady stream of income compared to non-educational book publishers, due to the recurring need for textbooks every year by students, are now gradually shifting towards digital publishing. This change is the result of overpriced textbooks which drove students towards less expensive sources like eBooks, used textbooks, rental books etc. A similar choice can be offered to higher education students. Students seek value for money.

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Pearson CEO Fallon Talks Common Core, Rise of ‘Open’ Resources

Marketplace K-12

A Pearson business motto is “content plus assessment, powered by technology, equalizes effective learning at scale,” Fallon said, and after years of striving for that goal, “we only feel that it’s really now starting to come together.”. The weight of the activity will be in blended learning, and how you combine the benefits of face-to-face with purely online approaches.”.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

It works well, that is, if you disregard student data privacy and security. Affluent students get to digital tools for creative exploration; poor students get to use theirs for test prep. In 2012, Pearson, Cengage Learning, and Macmillan Higher Education sued Boundless Learning, claiming that the open education textbook startup had “stolen the creative expression of their authors and editors, violating their intellectual-property rights.”