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How a Flipped Syllabus, Twitter and YouTube Made This Professor Teacher of the Year

Edsurge

Boyer uses a “flipped syllabus” in which students' final grades are based on the points they've earned—not lost—throughout the semester. Boyer uses a “flipped syllabus” in which students' final grades are based on the points they've earned—not lost—throughout the semester. We sat down with Boyer to learn more about his flipped syllabus, unique assessments, and the hard work that goes into an easy A. Does a flipped syllabus lead to a lot of A’s?

Favorite #EdTech Tools of 2015 @zaption @peardeck @techsmithedu @desmos @socraticorg @wacom #flipclass #edchat

techieMusings

Here are a few of my #EdTech tools of 2015: Camtasia – used to screen record & video edit my flipped classroom videos. ZAPTION enables me to truly personalize my flipped classroom by embedding formative assessment directly into video lessons.

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Using Technology to Personalize Learning @PearDeck @EDpuzzle #flipclass #blendedlearning #edtech

techieMusings

When I first began flipping my math classroom in 2010, the ability to screencast, upload to the web, and have students be able to watch lectures at their own pace was exciting and innovative.

A Welder of Digital Curriculum Companies Buys Its Latest

Edsurge

Since 2010, Weld North Education’s CEO and co-founder, Jonathan Grayer, has been scooping up online educational assets and fusing them together in an effort to create “the largest provider of digital curriculum serving preK-12 schools,” as he tells EdSurge in an interview. Many of these tools were used in environments that more closely resemble cubicles than classrooms, with students working by themselves in front of a computer.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

You can read the series here: 2010 , 2011 , 2012 , 2013 , 2014 , 2015 , 2016 , 2017 , 2018 , 2019. But in 2010, the company, co-founded by Gina Bianchini and Marc Andreessen, announced that it would no longer offer a free version. The Flipped Classroom".