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How Indian Tutoring App Provider Byju’s Got So Big

Edsurge

In this still from a Byju's provided video, about 20,000 students pack the country's largest indoor arena for a math lesson from the company's CEO in 2013. The stunt came years before the CEO’s company, Byju’s, launched a learning app that would take the company to 35 million downloads, with 2.7 These company’s teaching methods originated from tutoring sessions held offline by Raveendran himself. The company reported revenue of 14 billion rupees (about USD$196.89

5 Trends to Watch in 2011

The Electric Educator

Note: This is the second of my series "5 things to watch in 2011" Future installments will include: Five companies to watch in 2011 Five people to follow in 2011 Five technologies to watch in 2011 Five blogs to read in 201 Reverse Instruction is an innovative instructional strategy that was originally used by chemistry teachers Aaron Sams and Jon Bergman. Microsoft announced the deployment of Office Web Apps as a competitor to Google Apps.

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Ed Tech News, a New Podcast, and the Hack Education Roundup!

The Learning Revolution Has Begun

Can Google Challenge Over-Zealous Web Filtering at Schools? Politics and Policies FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski announced Connect to Compete , a new non-profit initiative that brings private industry and the non-profit sector together to help expand broadband adoption and promote digital literacy. and aims to address some of the obstacles to broadband adoption -- in terms of cost, access, relevance, and digital literacy.

The Politics of Education Technology

Hack Education

“ Facebook Is Not a Technology Company ,” media studies professor Ian Bogost also wrote in August. If that’s what “technology” means, then every company is in the technology business – a useless distinction. …There are companies that are firmly planted in the computing sector. The most interesting thing about companies like Alphabet, Amazon, and Facebook is that they are not (computing) technology companies.