Remove Assessment Remove Competency Based Learning Remove Flipped Classroom Remove Khan Academy

Why a K-12 Operating System is the Next Step in the Evolution of Edtech

Edsurge

Yes, this was before Google Classroom existed!) This competency-based system made sense; if students were chronically absent, holding them accountable to a pacing calendar would prove futile. To supplement in-person support offered during class and lunch periods, I published a simple Google site to house my lessons, assessments, and other resources. Abbas Manjee's standards-based Algebra 1 scope and sequence. Learn more about Kiddom Academy.

Why Flipped Learning Is Still Going Strong 10 Years Later

Edsurge

Ten years ago two Colorado chemistry teachers unleashed a brash concept on a K-12 landscape where few questioned the age-old formula of lecture, homework, assess, repeat. It became know as the flipped classroom—a modern, video-based version of a model pioneered by a handful of higher ed professors during the 1990s. And Bergmann, Sams and Khan turned it into a bonafide career path. Of course, the flipped movement still has its critics. Flipped OS.

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How teachers can go blended (when they’re the only one)

The Christensen Institute

About the author: Casey Lynch is a K-12 education research intern with the Christensen Institute focused on interviewing and profiling schools in the Blended Learning Universe Directory, and a rising 8th grade English teacher in The School District of Philadelphia. Many teachers interested in implementing blended learning may be deterred by challenges in their school contexts. So how might a teacher blend their classroom without the support of a school- or district-wide initiative?

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

In 2012, Pearson, Cengage Learning, and Macmillan Higher Education sued Boundless Learning, claiming that the open education textbook startup had “stolen the creative expression of their authors and editors, violating their intellectual-property rights.” The Flipped Classroom".