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In search of on-ramps to competency-based learning

The Christensen Institute

As more and more school systems across the country explore “going competency-based,” we need to be attentive to the processes that will actually allow such innovations to thrive. Current time- and age-based accountability measures have a stronghold on schools, even those trying to break away from the factory model of education. As a result, we would predict that time-based metrics and incentives could cannibalize many efforts to reinvent learning in a competency-based manner.

Utah and Florida sign bills to support competency-based learning pilots, but now the real work begins

The Christensen Institute

This month, governors in Utah and Florida signed bills supporting the creation of competency-based education pilot programs in districts and schools. Utah’s bill, SB 143 , creates the Competency-Based Education Grants Program, which allows local education agencies to apply for grants to pilot competency-based education programs. Treat competency-based learning as a whole-system—rather than one-off—reform.

Tackle teacher shortages with online learning

The Christensen Institute

As we’ve written before , one affordable and flexible solution stands out: online and blended learning hold the potential to unlock new solutions to the nation’s teacher capacity challenges. How online learning can solve teacher shortage problems.

Inputs do not guarantee outcomes: Getting online credit recovery right

The Christensen Institute

The Los Angeles Unified School District is back in the news for its use of technology, this time for its online credit-recovery courses. Actual learning—not a piece of paper—should be the goal for every student. For more, see: Getting the incentives right for online credit recovery.

Blended Learning Universe upgrades to drive educator learning, networking

The Christensen Institute

We live in an amazing time where school leaders have the capability to advance student-centered learning–the combination of personalizing learning and implementing competency-based learning–at scale. The engine to drive that transformation is blended learning. With the upgrade of the Blended Learning Universe (BLU) this week, educators and innovators have gained an important tool to advance this work.

Competency-based legal education

The Christensen Institute

In thinking about how best to prepare for that changing world, law schools need to consider how competency-based educational models can be employed to advance educational objectives for students seeking to enter the market for legal services. In this new environment, law schools need to reimagine themselves as educators for students interested in learning about the legal services sector, not simply those seeking a JD.

Beware of taking flexibility a step too far

The Christensen Institute

At its best, online learning can catalyze new heights of flexibility—in path, pace, place, space, and teacher-student interactions—amidst an education landscape that has long looked more like an industrial production line. In blended and online environments, students can move at their own pace, and when provided access to real-time data, teachers can intervene more nimbly when individual students get stuck.

What law schools should do to combat disruption

The Christensen Institute

That threat is likely to accelerate when, not if, a disruptive innovator emerges in legal education (in this context, the news of 2U’s partnership with Syracuse to build an online juris doctor (JD) program is worth watching). First, schools can use online learning as a sustaining innovation to improve learning and control costs. There has been plenty, from discount retail to online retail.

6 tips from personalized learning innovators leading change

The Christensen Institute

Earlier this year, the Rhode Island-based Highlander Institute and the Clayton Christensen Institute teamed up to bring together a conference on blended and personalized learning in Providence, R.I. Click here to learn more.

Does Presence Equal Progress? Tracking Engagement in Online Schools

Edsurge

We all remember classmates who sat in the back of the room, eyes glued to a comic or dog-eared paperback, anything to escape a learning environment that did not—or could not—engage them. But this innovation is at odds with a generations-old notion of what school should look like and it is spurring debate of the merit of online schools. Many valid questions have been raised about online schools. How do you know learning is happening?

How 2Revolutions is Helping Schools, Districts, and States Support Future of Learning Models

Edsurge

There are organizations that support different kinds of transformation in schools and after researching and interviewing some of these organizations, we've learned a great deal about what these changes can look like, how schools go about redesigning aspects of their model, and what types of support they need along the way. In October, we will share a guide highlighting the trends, insights and challenges we've learned about while profiling five key players in the world of school redesign.

The Trends and Challenges Shaping Technology Adoption In Schools

MindShift

Redesigning Learning Spaces: Panelists identified changing learning spaces as a trend that educators and district leaders have embraced for quite some time and which is likely to continue. Teachers are becoming more comfortable with this idea of “blending learning.”.

Will “school choice on steroids” get a boost under a Trump administration?

The Hechinger Report

The logical extension of such policies – permitting students to take individual courses wherever they wish, by using online options – has already begun to take root in about a dozen states. So far, only a tiny fraction of eligible students have enrolled for online classes.

Not Just Buzzwords: How Teachers Bring Big Ideas, Innovative Practices to Life

Edsurge

Blended learning in credit-recovery courses and alternative schools—areas where students would often have no brick-and-mortar options—has gotten a bad rap because of questions about the rigor of the online learning experience. But the Office of Educational Options at BCPS works hard with its teachers to keep standards high so that students are not merely recovering credits to graduate, but also learning. Education Technology School Models Learning Strategies

Has New Hampshire found the secret to online education that works?

The Hechinger Report

In January 2015, Duggan enrolled in New Hampshire’s self-paced Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS), joining about 200 full-time middle and high school students and about 10,000 part-timers from brick-and-mortar schools statewide who take VLACS courses a la carte. Competencies.

Texas districts are rethinking technology integrations

The Christensen Institute

Raise Your Hand Texas selected the book Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools as the training manual and CA Group as the implementation leaders for the project. Their learning gaps are too disparate for the teacher to remediate in a whole‐group setting.