Utah and Florida sign bills to support competency-based learning pilots, but now the real work begins

The Christensen Institute

This month, governors in Utah and Florida signed bills supporting the creation of competency-based education pilot programs in districts and schools. Utah’s bill, SB 143 , creates the Competency-Based Education Grants Program, which allows local education agencies to apply for grants to pilot competency-based education programs. Treat competency-based learning as a whole-system—rather than one-off—reform.

Inputs do not guarantee outcomes: Getting online credit recovery right

The Christensen Institute

In a recent editorial , the Los Angeles Times called into question the district’s record-high 75 percent graduation rate, as it said that the figure was based in part on LA Unified’s dependence on its less-than-rigorous online credit-recovery courses. Actual learning—not a piece of paper—should be the goal for every student. With rigorous, competency-based learning, effort is all but guaranteed since students must keep working until they truly master material.

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How should quality assurance for competency-based ed work?

The Christensen Institute

As online, competency-based learning gains steam in higher education, a critical question is emerging. If the federal government will fund competency-based programs through Title IV dollars, how should it think about regulating these programs? For online, competency-based programs, the old metrics are those focused on inputs. As competency-based programs emerge, we have little experience regulating them outside of the current constraints.

Tackle teacher shortages with online learning

The Christensen Institute

As we’ve written before , one affordable and flexible solution stands out: online and blended learning hold the potential to unlock new solutions to the nation’s teacher capacity challenges. For this to happen, policymakers and leaders will need to recognize online learning’s potential and to legislate and plan accordingly. As one computer science teacher, Sandy Gady, put it , “I can’t possibly learn CAD, apps, all that stuff.”

Coursera, K12, Inc. make bold moves to drive learning

The Christensen Institute

similarly stormed through the early 2000s by bringing online learning to the world of K-12 education and went public in 2007. As I told its team, offering courses from the top universities online and claiming that at last, anyone anywhere can access the best learning in the world isn’t correct. The reason is that the top universities do not offer the best teaching and learning experiences. LRN MOOC MOOCs online learning virtual learning

Competency-based legal education

The Christensen Institute

In thinking about how best to prepare for that changing world, law schools need to consider how competency-based educational models can be employed to advance educational objectives for students seeking to enter the market for legal services. In this new environment, law schools need to reimagine themselves as educators for students interested in learning about the legal services sector, not simply those seeking a JD.

Disruption looms for law schools

The Christensen Institute

With the emergence of online learning and the opportunity to pair it with competency-based learning and flexibly mix it all into place-based bootcamp type experiences that train students to practice law—the combination of which would be disruptive to higher education—legal education is awaiting a disruptive innovator that takes advantage of the current opportunity. The news that law schools are in crisis is not new.

Charter schools tackle shortcomings of college

The Christensen Institute

Summit Public Schools, a charter network based in Silicon Valley in California, had elements of this model. For the first time, their alums were being asked to truly learn on their own and figure out how to navigate their school’s requirements largely by themselves. Education Blog Blended learning Charter schools college College for America competency-based learning digital learning disruptive innovation graduation rates higher education Innovation K-12 education online learning

6 tips from personalized learning innovators leading change

The Christensen Institute

Earlier this year, the Rhode Island-based Highlander Institute and the Clayton Christensen Institute teamed up to bring together a conference on blended and personalized learning in Providence, R.I. The goal of the event was to focus on the practical elements of blended and personalized learning by surfacing the tactics that practitioners were deploying in the trenches. Click here to learn more. For more, see: Blended learning up close—really close.

Fostering competency in Arizona

The Christensen Institute

Yesterday the Arizona State Senate Education Committee voted 5-2 in favor of a bill that would create opportunities for schools to pilot competency-based education programs. All students in Arizona have distinct learning needs, and each deserves an education that is able to address those needs. But unfortunately, many students today struggle in school because the traditional education system was never designed to provide individualized learning opportunities.

Stepping aside to dig deeper: My next career move

The Christensen Institute

Our education team has galvanized a conversation around transforming our monolithic, factory-model education system into a student-centered one powered by the disruptive innovation of online learning so that all students can realize their fullest human potential—an idea that was not on the radar before 2007. Horn online learning

Disruptive innovation can help solve nation’s teacher shortage

The Christensen Institute

A critique against the power of disruptive innovation to help our schools educate each child more effectively has been a backhanded one: Yes, re-architecting schools around personalized learning is important, but even more important is having a highly effective teacher for every child. Online learning advocates have for a long time made this point. Second, officials should move from seat-time requirements to competency-based learning models.

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When to Teach Online Classes Live and When to Let Students Learn on Demand

Edsurge

Those weekly face-to-face sessions are as much about seeing people’s faces—seeing how tired they look, seeing how engaged they are in the material, seeing all of those kinds of things, and having that back and forth—as it is learning new content together,” she noted. It was really in the ‘80s and the ‘90s that the first satellite distance learning programs came up,” she adds, meaning students could sit in classrooms connected via interactive satellite TV.

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Texas districts are rethinking technology integrations

The Christensen Institute

These 75 organizations first confronted the puzzle together last summer, when Raise Your Hand Texas, a privately funded organization that advocates for public schools, invited all 1,200 Texas districts to compete for five opportunities to receive up to $500,000 each and intensive technical assistance to implement blended learning. In the fall, the 75 teams that demonstrated the most interest and readiness met together to begin to draft their blended-learning plans.