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Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

” More on the policy change via IHE. Online Education and the Once and Future “MOOC” Via the Coursera blog : “New mobile features: Transcripts, notes, and reminders.” " It’s lovely to see the big innovation from the MOOC startups in 2017 involves the learning management system. ” Edsurge profiles Lexia Learning in a new research series paid for by a variety of investors and corporations. Education Politics.

Chegg 42

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

In 2012, Pearson, Cengage Learning, and Macmillan Higher Education sued Boundless Learning, claiming that the open education textbook startup had “stolen the creative expression of their authors and editors, violating their intellectual-property rights.” Boundless’s materials have been archived by David Wiley’s company Lumen Learning. The greatest trick the ed-tech devil ever played was convincing people that clicking was “active learning.”)