Remove 2017 Remove Classroom Remove Differentiated Instruction Remove Education Elements

SMATH: How to Turn 2 Subjects Into 1 Super-Class

Edsurge

As educators, we always encourage our students to work together; we promise them two heads are better than one. But with so much happening in our individual classrooms, we teachers often don’t take our own good advice. We realized combining classes could help us integrate science and math standards, while team-teaching would allow us to differentiate instruction. Although we’d love to have one huge classroom, we just don’t have the space.

How to Create a Vision

Edsurge

As Education Elements has worked with districts across the country, we’ve found a few simple guidelines can help make the visioning process invigorating and inspiring rather than routine or frustrating. If you’re counting on principles of personalization to impact all levels of your organization, from IT support to HR decision-making to classroom instruction, you’ll likely want to include a diverse range of representatives early in the process.

How to Create a Vision

Edsurge

As Education Elements has worked with districts across the country, we’ve found a few simple guidelines can help make the visioning process invigorating and inspiring rather than routine or frustrating. If you’re counting on principles of personalization to impact all levels of your organization, from IT support to HR decision-making to classroom instruction, you’ll likely want to include a diverse range of representatives early in the process.

Million-Dollar Advice: The High Cost and Limited Return on Personalized Learning Consulting

Edsurge

Follow education technology-reform projects, and you’ll find mixed academic outcomes and expensive consultants. In July of 2015, the district paid more than $400,000 for alignment, strategy and professional services from Education Elements, a for-profit personalized learning consultant, according to receipts obtained by EdSurge from the district. In less than two years, between 2015 and 2017, the district paid more than $4.5