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4 Ways To Grow Your Personal Learning Network This Week

The Web20Classroom

Social media allows us to connect, to learn, to grow and to reflect not only within ourselves but with each other. She has them write 3 things they need to improve their learning and 3 things they can give to improve the learning of others.

Grow Your Own Personal Learning Network

Nik Peachey

This is just a quick posting to share a session on building your own Personal Learning Network, that I did for teachers in British Council Bilbao recently (25th September 2010). link] This is a great starter list for Twitter of people involved in ELT who you can follow.

Pillars of Digital Leadership Series: Professional Growth

A Principal's Reflections

However, the mounting pressure from ridiculous mandates as a result of the current education reform movement and massive budget cuts across the country, have made it a challenge to learn through traditional pathways. Now more than ever leaders need to take control of their learning.

8 Ways for Teachers (and Parents) to Use Twitter

Gaggle Speaks

Unless you’ve been living in a box at the bottom of the ocean since 2006, you should know about Twitter, the social network that lets users read and send “tweets” no more than 140 characters long. To help, here are eight ways to get to know Twitter better. Mobile Learning

A Wake Up Call For School Leaders

A Principal's Reflections

So the other day I tweeted out this comment, “I am amazed each day to see so much educational progress in my Twitter feed. This is not to say that they are unwilling to learn or embrace significant change in this area.

BYOD 293

Connect, Share, Learn

A Principal's Reflections

Through connected learning and sharing, I have become better equipped to lead change at New Milford High School and to begin to transform the teaching and learning process. Thank you to everyone out there that has made me a better leader, educator, and person.

The persistence of distance (learning)

Learning with 'e's

In a formal sense, distance learning has been a familiar concept since at least 1837, when Sir Isaac Pitman began teaching his shorthand system using typed instruction cards mailed through the universal Penny Postal service to his students across England.