Does Ownership of Instructional Materials Matter?

Doug Levin

While plenty of folks are touting the affordances of digital textbooks and instructional content and prognosticating about how fast K-12 schools make the switch to digital – including me and Arne Duncan among many others, etc., There also was only one dominant business model in the market: districts purchased one textbook per subject per grade per student from approved publishers. The post Does Ownership of Instructional Materials Matter?

What You Need to Know About Teaching Cybersecurity

edWeb.net

While classroom instruction is critical for any cybersecurity program, employers also want to see their future employees apply many of the terms, concepts, and methods before hitting the job market. edWeb Blog Cyber Security cybersecurity student data privacy

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The Big Picture on the 2019-20 PreK-12 Market

edWeb.net

According to Kathy Mickey, Senior Analyst of Simba Information, all of these could impact the instructional materials marker. In her recent presentation “ K-12 Instructional Materials: What’s New in 2019,” she previewed results from Simba’s Publishing for the PreK-12 Market, 2019-2020 , and talked about how digital is changing—and not changing—the landscape. Regarding the digital shift, ELA and literacy materials are still mainly print with digital supplements.

The top 10 school IT leader concerns

eSchool News

Annual survey outlines broadband, instructional materials, student data privacy as top among school IT leaders’ concerns. also revealed that school IT leaders are spending more time and devoting more resources to student data privacy and security. Privacy and security of student data is an increasing concern for IT leaders. About two-thirds said privacy and security are more important than they were last year.

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OPINION: What’s the high-tech tradeoff for students and teachers?

The Hechinger Report

Thirty years ago, Channel One offered schools nationwide $30,000 worth of audiovisual equipment at no cost in exchange for requiring students to view a daily current events program during class. Research showed that students did not significantly benefit from the news programming, and were more likely to remember the content of commercials than the news. Related: Students’ worry: education technology might predict failure before they have a chance to succeed.

A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 17 Edition)

Doug Levin

Tagged on: May 1, 2017 Navigation of Computer-Based Tests Matters for Young Students, Study Finds | Education Week → The assertion that neither mode nor UI would lead to different behaviors (and hence inferences) is what should be astounding. Plus, their servers often have the RDP protocol enabled as students want to access course material from home. And it's up to tech companies to make that clear — not bury it in privacy policies no one reads.

EdTech 150