Remove Google Remove Maker Movement Remove Robotics Remove Software

9 Fine Ways to Do Better 20% Time

The CoolCatTeacher

Twenty percent time from Google. Based on the Google 20% time, students take 20% of their time in a class to pursue a personal interest project. For our beginning of the year passion projects, some students chose to teach others about our robotic filming Swivl tool and app. Maker Movement. Many schools are creating maker spaces or “ Fab Labs ” so students have a space and place to invent. Essential Information on the Maker Movement.

6 Super Science Edtech Ideas: Using Technology to Level Up Science Classrooms

The CoolCatTeacher

I always think of giving my students that sandbox time so that they can play a little bit with the software. It might be typing up your notes in a Google Doc. Now, do you use robots? What about robotics? In my class, we use the Sphero robot quite a bit. See Top Tips for Teaching with Robots Using Sphero. We do use LEGO Mindstorms with like a couple kids here and there will LOVE to work with LEGO Mindstorms, and I have a robotics club that will use those.

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Makerspace for Little or Nothing

The Daring Librarian

You can take baby steps into the Maker Movement. I'm not 100% sold, even after 7 years of talking about the Maker Movement, that it's something that's here to stay and not just a fad. been using aspects of the movement since we opened our school in 1997, what if it's a flash in the pan? But what if we spend thousands of dollars on 3D printers, robotics, and other ephemera and it just ends up collecting dust?

The Stories We Were Told about Education Technology (2019)

Hack Education

Even if these publications fade away , the breathless stories about the possibilities of brainwave-reading mindfulness headbands and " mind-reading robot tutors in the sky " continue to be told. Carnegie Mellon announced it would open source its digital learning software. Google was fined $170 million for violating children’s privacy on YouTube. Google got into the anti-plagiarism business.