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A true gift from SHEG: DIY digital literacy assessments and tools for historical thinking

NeverEndingSearch

You may remember Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) for its groundbreaking and utterly depressing report, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Online Civic Reasoning. SHEG currently offers three impressive curricula that may be put to immediate use in secondary classrooms and libraries. All three are outstanding (and free), but perhaps the most immediately useful to readers of this blog is Civic Online Reasoning or COR.

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It’s 2020: Have Digital Learning Innovations Trends Changed?

Edsurge

In early 2017, organizations that have focused on digital learning came together to better leverage their strengths and capacities for a common goal: improving student success.

Trends 152
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Trends to watch in 2015: education and technology

Bryan Alexander

Online learning, or the teaching formerly knows as “distance learning” Will this keep growing? There’s now a movement to teach humanities seminars online. Skepticism about the quality of online learning could migrate to the general population. MOOCs? And the MOOC numbers look like they’re rising. Unless the worm turns globally, I’d expect planet MOOC to keep growing in 2016.

Trends 45
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Storms over liberal education: notes on the 2016 AAC&U conference

Bryan Alexander

A quick round of introductions revealed some interesting trends: a growing number of liberal arts institutions are launched or growing online learning programs; many sought to find the distinct ways liberal arts institutions, and campuses pursuing liberal education, can use technology. Discussion went in some interesting angles, such as secondary education. Online learning is on the rise.