How technology can help—not hurt—family connections

The Christensen Institute

Between headlines about children’s ballooning screen time to growing concerns about the costs of distracted parenting , it’s easy to scapegoat technology for troubling family dynamics. In 2018, good parenting and technology don’t seem to mix. But what if technology could start to prompt conversations that parents and children otherwise struggle to initiate? And more importantly, what if technology opened up time for more and better face-to-face interactions to take root?

Transitioning Edtech to the Cloud

edWeb.net

At the beginning of the edtech wave, superintendents saw many benefits from using digital resources in the classroom. For administrators looking to take the focus of edtech away from upkeep and back to learning, moving to the cloud could be the answer.

Empowering Superintendents to Connect Technology and Learning

edWeb.net

“If it’s edtech, it must be good,” used to be the mantra in schools. In fact, many school technology plans fluctuated depending upon the latest fads and what someone learned at a conference and had little connection to curriculum or learning goals.

Could Giving Parents Homework Help Students? Schools Try ‘Family Playlists’

Edsurge

For the past 18 months, a pilot program in a South Bronx public school, called “Family Playlists,” developed by the New York-based nonprofit, PowerMyLearning , has used technology to increase families’ involvement in their students’ learning. Having families deeply involved in what their kids are doing in class really matters,” says Elisabeth Stock, chief executive of PowerMyLearning. That approach resonated well with PowerMyLearning, which Stock started in 1999.

Essential Elements for Moving to a 1:1 Environment

edWeb.net

However, the more successful schools focus on improving teaching and learning first with edtech being just one of the tools to support it. Moving to a 1:1 environment requires an overhaul of every district building and technology resource. Step 1: Make a plan.

EduStar Platform Promises Quick, Randomized Ed-Tech Trials

Marketplace K-12

The technology platform is the product of a grant-funded collaboration between two professors and the nonprofit PowerMyLearning. It runs trials on granular pieces of digital learning activities via the PowerMyLearning Connect platform, which is available free to schools.

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

Although much of the focus of ed-tech involves what happens at school, it’s important to remember that the corporate and consumer markets for “learning technologies” are much larger. Speaking of ed-tech exacerbating inequality, Edsurge looks at PowerMyLearning ’s plans to give parents homework – “family playlists” – to do alongside their children. ( Via Campus Technology : “Study Uncovers How Ed Tech Decision-Making Works.”

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

” Via Politico : “ Stanley Buchesky , formerly a managing partner at the venture capital firm The EdTech Fund , will work [at the Department of Education] on budget and finance issues.” ” Among The EdTech Fund’s investments : Teachboost and Citelighter. Via the MIT Technology Review : “For $14,000, a Weeklong Firehose of Silicon Valley Kool-Aid.” PowerMyLearning has received $6.5