Wed.Sep 05, 2018

The Secret Agents of Jordan Jackson Elementary School

The CoolCatTeacher

Rayna Freedman on Episode 353 of the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter. Rayna Freedman inspires her elementary students with a spy-themed classroom experience that runs throughout the year.

What You Might Have Missed in August

Ask a Tech Teacher

Here are the most-read posts for the month of August: Teaching Digital Rights and Responsibilities. The Important Morning Meeting. It’s Time to Make Your Classroom Paper-free. Wikispaces has closed. What are your alternatives? 11 Back-to-school Activities for the First Month of School.

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Five Stories of Transformation from Our Fifth Annual Report

Education Elements

This week, we released our 2017-2018 Annual Report. The report marks eight years since Education Elements was founded, and our fifth such report.

Report 151

Virtual Tours: Around the World with a VR Headset

Veative

As illustrated by the intricate inlay and pietra dura work on the walls of the marble mausoleum, the Taj Mahal is the ultimate expression of the elegance of Mughal architecture and craftsmanship. Considering the hordes of tourists that it draws, it makes one wish to become a bird, so that they can fly above the masses and study the decorations closely.

5 Costly Inventory Management Mistakes Schools Should Avoid

If your school is like most, inventory and/or asset management plays a critical role in daily operations.

Five Stories of Transformation from Our Fifth Annual Report

Education Elements

This week, we released our 2017-2018 Annual Report. The report marks eight years since Education Elements was founded, and our fifth such report.

Report 130

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Focus on School, District and Regional Transformation in Our Fifth Annual Report

Education Elements

This week, we released our 2017-2018 Annual Report. The report marks eight years since Education Elements was founded, and our fifth such report.

Report 130

4 Tips to Boost Your K12 District’s Wi-Fi

EdTech Magazine

4 Tips to Boost Your K12 District’s Wi-Fi. eli.zimmerman_9856. Wed, 09/05/2018 - 11:42. With Wi-Fi now the primary, default and sometimes only internet access for students and staff in schools, it’s vital to get the most out of its infrastructure.

Old Idea, New Economy: Rediscovering Apprenticeships

The Hechinger Report

You might think apprenticeships are a relic from an earlier era, but a growing number of Americans are using them as a way into the middle class. South Carolina has bet heavily on apprenticeships.

Report 107

How to design remarkable active learning classrooms [checklist]

Nureva

“Architecture is the story of how we see ourselves,” wrote American architect Thom Mayne. He could have just as easily been speaking about classroom design.

eBook 88

Teachers’ Guide to Plagiarism

This article provides teachers with a step-by-step guide on how to handle plagiarism in the classroom: it examines the definition of the term "plagiarism" and its types with examples, describes common reasons students plagiarize, and provides tips for teachers to detect and prevent plagiarism among students.

A “handmade forerunner” of personalized learning, forged by teachers

The Hechinger Report

Jenn Zweber and a group of students in grades K through 3 discuss the impact of a Service Learning project on their community, during the first year that Impact Academy at Orchard Lake opened in Lakeville, Minnesota. Photo: Julene Oxton.

Have CONTROL Over Your Links – Hold Down the Control Key

Teacher Tech

Hold Down the Control Key It is helpful to get in the habit of holding down the Control key (Command on a Mac) when clicking on links. This forces the link to open in a new tab so you do not lose the page you are on. Google Search When you Google Search something very […]. The post Have CONTROL Over Your Links – Hold Down the Control Key appeared first on Teacher Tech. Classroom Google Intermediate Keyboard Shortcuts Chrome classroom G Suite google

To teach, protect and serve

The Hechinger Report

This story about school violence was produced in a collaboration between The Trace , an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit newsroom dedicated to shining a light on America’s gun violence crisis; The Hechinger Report , a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education; and Marie Claire. One central message of post-Parkland activism: Gun violence has changed what it means to be a student in America. Teachers say that everything has changed for them, too. In a survey conducted by Educators for Excellence, a teacher-led advocacy group, gun violence ranked as teachers’ No. 1 school safety concern. Arming teachers is among the recommendations offered by the Department of Education in an upcoming report , but it would be unpopular : the survey found that 65 percent of teachers are against carrying firearms to protect students from active shooters. As educators settle into the 2018-19 school year, we asked nine teachers and administrators how they wrestle with one persistent truth about American gun violence: It can happen anywhere. Their responses reflect their different backgrounds, experiences and student populations. One teacher from rural Kansas worries that her small town isn’t adequately prepared to respond to a school shooting. Another recalls fielding difficult questions from first-graders after an active shooter drill. Some told us about the classroom supplies they’ve transformed into tools of survival: a cement hall pass ready to be used as a bludgeon, a ball of yarn that can double as a tourniquet band. An educator in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, where violent crime is high, isn’t worried about a mass shooting: Gun violence is an ever-present threat for his students. All of the teachers said that their job isn’t just to help students learn, it’s also to keep them safe. High school teacher Harley Brook has pondered using the books on this shelf as weapons in the case of an active shooter scenario. Photo courtesy Harley Brook. “The day that I have to carry a gun as a requirement for me to teach, I’m done.”. Harley Brook is about to enter his 12th year of teaching English at a public high school near Chicago. “I have a bookshelf in my room. I used to think, ‘I’m going to populate this with books in case a kid needs something to read.’ Now, every year, when I go back to restock that bookshelf, there’s a part of me that’s also thinking, ‘This is something a kid could pick up and throw if someone made their way into my classroom.’ It’s mind-blowing to me that that’s something I even have to think about. “The day that I have to carry a gun as a requirement for me to teach, I’m done. I’ll find some other way to make use of my education and my background and experience. I didn’t get into this because I want ‘to teach, protect, and serve’ to be my job description.”. “I have yet to hear a student add ‘guns’ to a list of things that would make them feel safe.”. Nina Leuzzi has taught pre-K in Boston, Massachusetts, for 10 years. She is now the dean of School Culture and Community at a Boston charter school, where she also teaches educators how to support students who have experienced trauma and create supportive classroom communities. “If I’m a kid and I walk into a school where my teacher had a handgun and there were metal detectors, I think my anxiety level would be significantly higher than if I walked in and my teacher gave me a hug or if I knew that there were a counselor I could talk to if something happened at home that night or that morning. Those are the kinds of things that breathe safety into schools. “In my 10 years of teaching, I have yet to hear a student add ‘guns’ to a list of things that would make them feel safe. What they’re really looking for is to feel like they’re cared for.”. Lockdown instructions posted in Nivia Vizurraga’s elementary school classroom. Photo courtesy Nivia Vizurraga. “This really could happen.”. Nivia Vizurraga is going into her 12th year of teaching. She currently teaches K-5 special education at an elementary school in Reseda, California. “During the drills, we close our blinds, lock our doors and have our students go under the tables or somewhere they could actually hide. In the moment of the drill, it is a somewhat scary situation. After 15 or 20 minutes, the principal will say the drill is over, but then there’s the conversation that happens afterward. “The students ask questions like, ‘If someone knocks on the door, should we answer?’ ‘When do our parents get called?’ ‘Are we going to be okay?’. “It’s difficult as a teacher because you want to let your children know that they are safe. But you also have to be realistic in telling them that this really could happen.”. “Would I ask a teacher to put their life on the line for my kids?”. Melissa Dorcemus is in her seventh year of teaching. She currently teaches ninth-grade special education math at a high school in New York City. “My husband is in law enforcement. We’ve had discussions about putting his life on the line in his job. When I first started teaching, that wasn’t something I thought about for myself. I never thought I would be the person defending a room of innocent children. The thought has started to cross my mind more as tragedies keep happening. “Now, I’m pregnant with my own child. I’ve gotten very emotional thinking about sending my own child to school someday. Would I ask a teacher to put their life on the line for my kids? Would I do it for other people’s kids? You love them like they’re your own, but at the end of the day, they’re not. “If I do this for my class, will I be home for my baby?”. “My students aren’t worried about mass shootings. It’s when they leave school that they are more at risk.”. Isaiah Sago taught math for 10 years in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. He recently started a new position as a restorative justice teacher advisor for Los Angeles Unified School District, working inside schools to help teachers create safe and welcoming classrooms. “We’ve never dealt with any gun violence on campus. We have had students who stay on campus longer because they felt more protected at school versus out in their community. “Gun violence in Watts is not uncommon. Whether it’s from police officers or whether it’s from gangs or the projects, it’s something [students are] used to. So for most of my kids, school is somewhere to get away from all that. It’s a safe haven for them. [Arming teachers] would make it even harder for my students.”. The baseball bat, cement hall pass and bug spray that high school teacher Margo L. has imagined using in an active shooter scenario. Photo courtesy Margo L. “ We’ve gone from ‘I’m here to help you prepare for your future’ to ‘I’m here to decide who gets to live and who gets to die.’ ”. Margo L. is entering her 19th year teaching high school social studies at a public school in rural Kansas. “We live in a small, rural town that has one police officer on duty and an extremely small hospital. I’m not sure it has ever seen a gunshot wound. Last spring, after Parkland, we had a full-blown active-shooter drill to test our town’s response. “Student actors had fake blood on them with different injuries to test whether the hospital would be able to respond to those types of wounds. During the drill, they asked us to do what we would actually do in the situation. “Once you’re in lockdown, you’re not supposed to open the door, even if you know the person, because school shooters have been students. They placed one of my best friend’s kids outside my room. She was crying. I failed. I opened the door and pulled her in. She had been ‘shot’ in the leg. I had some yarn in my cabinet, so I tied a tourniquet around her leg. If this were real, I don’t think I would be able to let a kid die out in the hallway. “I was shocked at how emotional I became. We’re at the place where I have to decide whether the kid in the hall gets saved or whether I open up my students in my classroom to possible harm. We’ve gone from ‘I’m here to help you prepare for your future’ to ‘I’m here to decide who gets to live and who gets to die.’ It’s crazy to me that that’s now part of my job. “I have an extremely heavy hall pass. My plan is to stand by the door with that. Whoever enters is going to get a face full of concrete. We’ve also got bug spray that can shoot up to twenty feet. And I’ve got a baseball bat locked away in my closet.”. “I would take a bullet for my kids, but I shouldn’t have to.”. A curtain, handmade by elementary school teacher Marla Savage, can open to cover the windows in the event of a lock-down. Photo courtesy Marla Savage. Marla Savage teaches third grade in New Jersey. The 2018-19 school year will be her eighth year of teaching. “Sometimes we tell the kids that we do the drills in case there’s ever bad weather or a wild animal gets in the building. But by third grade, the kids know that’s not true. “During the drills, administration always walks around and checks the whole building, making sure doors are locked. When I hear our doorknob jiggle, it always gives me goose bumps. I look at these amazing, beautiful children in front of me, huddled together silently in the closet. I would take a bullet for my kids, but I shouldn’t have to.”. “We need help to help these kids.”. Christina Kim is going into her 14th year teaching in the Los Angeles Unified School District. She is currently a Title III instructional coach working with English language learner students. “You hear stories about the kids who have committed mass shootings and you hear about how they were bullied or were struggling emotionally. I wonder what situation we would be in now if we had counselors, school psychologists or people specialized in trauma consistently working on school campuses with these students. “At one school site I worked at, we had a student who witnessed his father being arrested by cops. He saw them pull a gun on him. He was running out of the classroom all the time, bullying other kids, and pushing and kicking adults. I used all the tools I had to help him, but I realized that this situation was beyond my skill set. He was calling out for help. We needed someone who was specialized in trauma to help him. “We need help to help these kids. We need resources.”. “Everyone needs to be thinking about this, not just teachers.”. Elementary school teacher Michael Raney keeps a baseball bat alongside her classroom supplies. Photo courtesy Michael Raney. Michael Raney is in her eighth year of teaching. She teaches third grade in a public school district in Texas. “After Parkland, I bought a baseball bat that I keep in my closet. I don’t know if it would be useful in the event of a shooting. But as a teacher, you want to be prepared. “When I’m doing something like buying a baseball bat or Googling ‘What are strategies to use in a school shooting?’ I just keep thinking, ‘This shouldn’t be my problem. This is not the level at which this needs to be handled.’ ”. This story about school violence was produced in a collaboration between The Trace , an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit newsroom dedicated to shining a light on America’s gun violence crisis; The Hechinger Report , a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education; and Marie Claire. The post To teach, protect and serve appeared first on The Hechinger Report. K-12 News Partners Law and policy Mental health and trauma teachers

Diversity in Hiring Doesn’t Start With Hiring

Edsurge

Looking for a candidate who's got it all? EdSurge’s jobs fairs offer unparalleled access to a unique pool of candidates who have both the educational experience and technology skills your organization needs. Learn more here. San Francisco, October 10, 2018. Boston, October 16, 2018. New York, October 17, 2018. The business case for building a diverse workforce is growing stronger every day. Diversity is an important aspect of any organization.

Custom eLearning: What to Consider as an L&D Manager

A custom eLearning project is an exciting opportunity, but any L&D Manager will also tell you it can be challenging. Inno-versity shares 5 points to consider before kicking off your project. These concepts are critical to addressing the most common pain points which, IF addressed, will ensure success.

TLC Ninja: Martin Cisneros Focuses on What EAL Students Can Do

CUE

Martin Cisneros believes that we should be looking at what our students learning English as an Additional Language (EAL) can do, not at what they can’t. Did you know he was doing his family’s taxes in 1st grade? The TLC Ninja team sure didn’t.

Beyond the Fizz: Turning Moments of Wonder into Lifelong Learning

Edsurge

No one cared that it was cold outside. These kids could hardly wait to see what would happen next. Giggles and laughter bounced from child to child as the group of second graders positioned themselves around the 2-liter bottle of diet soda. In a whispered voice, one boy asked, “Do you really think she’s going to do it?” Sure… she’ll do it, but you have to get ready to run,” replied the girl standingnext to him.

CrowdBeamer – A Self-Contained Portable, Interactive Wi-Fi Classroom In-a-Box

EmergingEdTech

Fire up your Crowdbeamer and present interactively! Have you ever been in a situation as a teacher (or any other kind of presenter for that matter) where you wish you could just fire up your own. Please click on the post title to continue reading the full post. Thanks (and thanks for subscribing)!]. iPads and Other Tablet Devices iPhones and Smartphones Mobile Learning Resources Presentation tools

First Days of School: Keep it Simple

Reading By Example

The classroom could have been for almost any age level. The bulletin board was bare besides the butcher paper stapled up with colorful border framing each side. Book bins stood empty, waiting to be filled with reading material.

eBook 73

Key Elements for Successful eLearning Projects

Discover how this rapid development process creates engaging, custom learning solutions on a timeline that works for you, why a strong learning culture is important, and how to showcase your Return on Learning (ROL) using data to tell the story.

Makerspaces A to Z: Aspirational

techlearning

As we embark on another school year, I thought I would launch a new series, Makerspaces A to Z. Throughout the year I’m going to share what I think are the key ingredients to building a sustainable makerspace in a series of short blog posts. [

Optimizing Your LinkedIn Profile for Your Edtech Job Hunt

Edsurge

Looking to level up in your career? Join us at one of our jobs fairs EdSurge is hosting a series of jobs fairs this October! Come join us for an evening of informal networking, panels with hiring companies, and some light bites. San Francisco, October 10, 2018. Boston, October 16, 2018. New York, October 17, 2018. Can't make it? Fill out this form and we'll get your information in front of attending companies.

The TeachThought Podcast Ep. 131 Balancing Screen Time And Digital Media With Real Life

TeachThought - Learn better.

The TeachThought Podcast Ep. 131 Balancing Screen Time And Digital Media With Real Life Drew Perkins talks with Anya Kamenetz about her new book and the issue of balancing the use of digital media and screen time with our children and students.

GoGuardian Announces Beacon, Self-Harm Prevention Tool for Schools

techlearning

GoGuardian announces Beacon, a suicide and self-harm prevention tool for K-12 schools, that acts as an early-warning system to help schools proactively identify at-risk students.

The Ultimate 12 Step Guide For Choosing The Perfect Learning Management System

Picking the wrong LMS can cost you. Don’t settle for a disconnected, hard-to-use, expensive system that doesn’t meet your needs. Follow these 12 steps crafted by Lambda Solutions' LMS experts, and find your perfect eLearning solution!

What’s Included With a Wireless Site Survey?

SecurEdge

It’s hard to believe, but as recently as 15 years ago, wireless networks were still a novelty and a rarity. Sure if you had a large IT budget and advanced in-house IT talent, you had WiFi back then.

ACT’s Latest Act: Investing in an Open-Source Assessment Startup

Edsurge

ACT , the nonprofit best known for its college-readiness test, is undergoing a major transformation. Ever since taking the helm as CEO in 2015, Marten Roorda says ACT has closed 10 deals in which it has invested in, acquired or formed strategic partnerships with educational companies. Its latest act: making a strategic investment in Open Assessment Technologies (OAT), a San Francisco-based startup that offers open-source tools for building and delivering digital tests.

From Poverty To Rocket Scientist To CEO, A Girl Scout’s Inspiring Story

MindShift

Sylvia Acevedo grew up on a dirt road in New Mexico. Her family was poor, living “paycheck to paycheck.” ” After a meningitis outbreak in her Las Cruces neighborhood nearly killed her younger sister, her mother moved the family to a different neighborhood.

STEM 58

How to design remarkable active learning classrooms [checklist]

Nureva

“Architecture is the story of how we see ourselves,” wrote American architect Thom Mayne. He could have just as easily been speaking about classroom design.

eBook 56

Leveraging Learner Variability to Elevate Equity in EdTech

Speaker: Vic Vuchic, Chief Innovation Officer & Executive Director, Learner Variability Project

In this webinar, Vic Vuchic, Chief Innovation Officer of Digital Promise, will share his insights into the modern boom in neuroscience and learning sciences research. You'll discover how much more we know now about how students learn - and how we can use that knowledge to create EdTech-enabled classrooms that can meet the diverse needs of all students.