Remove Dropout Remove Elementary Remove Personalized Learning Remove Trends

The messy reality of personalized learning

The Hechinger Report

In tiny Foster, Rhode Island, teachers at Captain Isaac Paine Elementary School use high-tech methods to teach a largely rural, off-the-grid population. Down Route 6, not far from the Shady Acres Restaurant and Dairy, is Captain Isaac Paine Elementary School. In another room, children rotate through learning stations, sometimes at screens, sometimes putting pencils to paper. Future of Learning. Mississippi Learning.

Tipping point: Can Summit put personalized learning over the top?

The Hechinger Report

(From left to right) Sixth graders Mia DeMore, Maria DeAndrade, and Stephen Boulas make a number line in their math class at Walsh Middle School in Framingham, Massachusetts, one of 132 “Basecamp” schools piloting the Personalized Learning Platform created by the Summit charter school network. Some passionately believe that it can and must, while skeptics fear that personalized-learning hype has outpaced research into if and, importantly, how it helps students.

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Will the students who didn’t show up for online class this spring go missing forever?

The Hechinger Report

Monica Williams remembers the late May day she and first grade teacher Lizette Gutierrez reconnected with the four young siblings from Cable Elementary. No teachers from the San Antonio elementary had heard from the children since schools closed abruptly in March due to the pandemic.

Is the new education reform hiding in plain sight?

The Hechinger Report

Rogers Elementary fourth-grade teacher Sudhir Vasal created math lesson pathways so each child can progress at their own pace. Rogers Elementary School here set a three-alarm fire in the library. Their changed view — and that of others who shunned Rogers and now want in — is driven by what seems to be a magic educational elixir: personalized learning. But personalized learning raises big questions about educational equity. Future of Learning.

Blended learning proof points showcase district schools

The Christensen Institute

Public school districts began innovating with blended learning before most charter schools. According to surveys that Brian Bridges has conducted in multiple states, including California where blended learning is growing rapidly, more school districts utilize blended learning than do charter schools. And the pace of innovation with blended learning is picking up within school districts nationwide.

Why educators are moving away from the Station Rotation model

The Christensen Institute

The Station Rotation has consistently reigned as the most popular blended-learning model implemented by elementary schools. Of the 235 active elementary schools currently profiled in the BLU school directory , 136, or 58 percent, of them have a Station Rotation program. Although still early, this data provides a trend line worth following as blended and personalized learning continue to evolve. For more, see: With blended learning, plan on change.

Twenty-one and in high school

The Hechinger Report

This story is part of a Hechinger reporting series about how “last chance” high schools are pioneering some of the latest trends in high school reform. While other schools adopt different strategies to keep students in class, Bronx Arena, in the Bronx borough of New York City, is betting on close relationships and a personalized academic program to get the job done. When they arrive at Bronx Arena, many need help before being able to re-engage with learning.