Remove Dropout Remove Elementary Remove Personalized Learning Remove Student Engagement

Will the students who didn’t show up for online class this spring go missing forever?

The Hechinger Report

Monica Williams remembers the late May day she and first grade teacher Lizette Gutierrez reconnected with the four young siblings from Cable Elementary. No teachers from the San Antonio elementary had heard from the children since schools closed abruptly in March due to the pandemic.

Why educators are moving away from the Station Rotation model

The Christensen Institute

The Station Rotation has consistently reigned as the most popular blended-learning model implemented by elementary schools. Of the 235 active elementary schools currently profiled in the BLU school directory , 136, or 58 percent, of them have a Station Rotation program. Although still early, this data provides a trend line worth following as blended and personalized learning continue to evolve. The Station Rotation may fail to promote student agency.

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Improving Social-Emotional and Reading Skills

edWeb.net

As the importance and benefits of social-emotional learning (SEL) have become more widely recognized, many teachers have struggled to combine this type of learning with their required curriculum. SEL also decreases behavioral issues, dropout rates, drug use, and teen pregnancy, so the advantages of including it in elementary and secondary classes are clear. Additionally, Bobbi served as a learning facilitator, encouraging students to take ownership of their learning.

Erasing the Look and Feel of Poverty

Digital Promise

The majority of K-12 students in the U.S. For these students, poverty brings a host of other disadvantages, most beyond the school district’s control: broken homes, transient living situations, and a lack of educational support at home. Between 30 and 40 percent of students enter kindergarten not ready for school. Once they start their education, those students have a wider variety of social and emotional needs and receive less educational enrichment outside of school.

Erasing the Look and Feel of Poverty

Digital Promise

The majority of K-12 students in the U.S. For these students, poverty brings a host of other disadvantages, most beyond the school district’s control: broken homes, transient living situations, and a lack of educational support at home. Between 30 and 40 percent of students enter kindergarten not ready for school. Once they start their education, those students have a wider variety of social and emotional needs and receive less educational enrichment outside of school.