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How one district solved its special education dropout problem

The Hechinger Report

He remembers thinking it looked like a book you’d find in an elementary school, with a picture of the numbers 1 through 9 written in the sand of a beach on the cover. The district’s class of 2010 had a 73 percent graduation rate for students in special education and a 13 percent dropout rate — double the dropout rate for the student body overall. Special education teachers joined meetings with general education teachers.

How the pandemic has altered school discipline — perhaps forever

The Hechinger Report

That same day, six other students across the district were written up for not wearing their masks correctly (including one who also faked using hand sanitizer), while an elementary school student was assigned three days of “private dining” for sharing food in violation of safety guidelines.

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Will the students who didn’t show up for online class this spring go missing forever?

The Hechinger Report

Monica Williams remembers the late May day she and first grade teacher Lizette Gutierrez reconnected with the four young siblings from Cable Elementary. No teachers from the San Antonio elementary had heard from the children since schools closed abruptly in March due to the pandemic.

Students have their own demands for school reopening

The Hechinger Report

While individual school districts in Arizona have opted to start the year online, the group is calling for remote learning statewide. Elementary students told Pressley they wanted more opportunities to interact with their classmates; one fourth grader suggested Zoom recess.

Survey 113

COLUMN: Isolated in dorm rooms or stuck at home, some freshmen wonder if college is worth it

The Hechinger Report

Fogel, 18, can recite a list of typical college experiences she has missed out on: study groups, small seminars, office hours with professors, parties, football games, a chance to meet new people from around the world. Columnists Coronavirus and Education Elementary to High School From The Editors Desk Higher Education News Graduation and dropouts Higher education access Higher education affordability Higher education completion

OPINION: Four ways to support refugee students during the pandemic

The Hechinger Report

Here are some ways to help refugee students this fall and beyond: Hold weekly virtual small-group sessions. Also, have one-on-one meetings with students. When schools closed down due to the Covid-19 pandemic, refugee students faced special hurdles.

Coronavirus becomes unprecedented test for teacher-student relationships

The Hechinger Report

Along with Rose, I contacted a middle and an elementary school teacher to see how they are faring. Now, during morning meetings via Google classroom, Glick is the one being peppered with questions – and often she can’t answer them. In Wood’s suburban Massachusetts district, elementary school educators were so concerned about their students they held a car parade , driving through streets and shouting greetings from a distance.

‘Backpacks full of boulders’: How one district is addressing the trauma undocumented children bring to school

The Hechinger Report

Cooper Lane Elementary School in Maryland’s Prince George’s County school district had almost 550 children, 60 percent of whom are Hispanic. Berta Romero is a counselor for English learners in Mary Harris Mother Jones Elementary school in Adelphi. ADELPHI, Md.

Home visiting in high school: Trying an intervention for toddlers on teenagers

The Hechinger Report

The success of home visits has been well documented for infants and has been studied at the elementary and middle school level , but it’s an open question whether these visits make a difference for older students, according to some experts. Like elementary and middle school home visits, high school home visits are all about relationship building. Now, she’s the most outspoken person you’ll ever meet,” he said. Johnathan romps with his dog, Pork Chop, in front of his home.

Why decades of trying to end racial segregation in gifted education haven’t worked

The Hechinger Report

On a crisp day in early March, two elementary school gifted and talented classes worked on activities in two schools, three miles and a world apart. Black, Latino and Indigenous groups are often left out. There are gifted dropouts.

A school district wades through a deluge of social-emotional curricula to find one that works

The Hechinger Report

Meghan Groves, a teacher at Washington-Lee Elementary School, in Bristol, Virginia, leads her first graders in “closing circle,” where they talk about how their day went. Leave this field empty if you're human: Activities like this one have taken on a near-ritualistic quality at Groves’ school, Washington-Lee Elementary, which serves a high-poverty student body in southern Appalachia. Now every class begins with a “morning meeting.”

High schools fail to provide legally required education to students with disabilities

The Hechinger Report

high school with a traditional diploma, proving that his disability didn’t prevent him from meeting the same standards as his peers. Hatharasinghe-Gerschler had been diagnosed with a reading comprehension disability in elementary school. Ensuring that all children with disabilities have appropriately ambitious goals and the chance to meet challenging objectives is a priority for the department,” DeVos said in a July speech. K-12 News Graduation and dropouts Special educatio

Special education’s hidden racial gap

The Hechinger Report

A Hechinger Report analysis of federal data exposes the stark racial gap between different groups of special education students. Experts say black and Latino parents often feel ignored and belittled at meetings with school officials, and their special-needs children are more likely to attend schools in high-poverty districts that lack the resources to provide them with the services they need to catch up. How one district solved its special education dropout problem.

Low academic expectations and poor support for special education students is ‘hurting their future’

The Hechinger Report

During his sophomore year, Nelson and his parents hired an advocate who began attending meetings with them. Thorossian said she was disappointed to learn that Nelson and his parents had been unable to work out their issues with the school system during yearly meetings to finalize his Individualized Education Program, or IEP. As we meet a student as a freshman at the door, not all of [their ability] is apparent as of yet,” Bibelheimer said.

The vast majority of students with disabilities don’t get a college degree

The Hechinger Report

Experts estimate that up to 90 percent should be able to graduate high school meeting the same standards as general education students, ready to succeed in college and careers. Skills like knowing how to ask for help or organize a study group “are as important as anything else you’re going to learn,” said Tudisco. He’d create a study group to go over the terms with classmates or make flashcards. K-12 News Graduation and dropouts Higher education access Special education

Homework in a McDonald’s parking lot: Inside one mother’s fight to help her kids get an education during coronavirus

The Hechinger Report

She was making ends meet by working as a cashier at a local gas station, until an injury took her off the job. Greenville schools have some of the highest school dropout rates in the state, and Johnson also viewed staying at home as necessary to defend her children’s chances of living an easier life. “I She’d created a Facebook group at the start of the school year for families of the children she taught. On the way back to her car, she saw a group of her students.

Tipping point: Can Summit put personalized learning over the top?

The Hechinger Report

So it was with parents at one of the first Basecamp schools, Marshall Pomeroy Elementary in Milpitas, a small city off the southern tip of San Francisco Bay. Those connections start with one-on-one mentoring, in which teachers meet with students weekly to discuss short-term goals, such as completing a certain number of units in a history course, and long-term goals that stretch into college and career. K-12 News achievement gap Graduation and dropouts teachers

Out of the fields: In a North Carolina county where few Latino parents have diplomas, their kids are aiming for college

The Hechinger Report

In Guatemala and El Salvador, around a quarter of students don’t even make it through elementary school, according to the World Bank, while in Honduras, about 17 percent of children don’t get past primary school. Her parents, who emigrated from Guatemala in 2000, were among those who never made it through elementary school. The program held evening meetings for families in Spanish, with Latin American food, to help connect parents to the school.

The big jobs of small-town principals

The Hechinger Report

Snyder is the principal of the elementary, middle and high schools in this tiny town in southeastern Colorado. The district is working to improve results at its elementary school, which has been underperforming. Thanks for having a plan in place,” Snyder tells the teacher before heading off to the elementary school wing. “I Shellinger says even multitasking school leaders in isolated districts can make room for instructional work, and training from groups like SAM can help.

After a hate crime, a town welcomes immigrants into its schools

The Hechinger Report

Wilda Rosario’s support groups for immigrant students at Patchogue-Medford High School usually start out with lots of laughter. But it doesn’t take too long for conversations to turn serious with this group of kids, most of them children seeking asylum from violence in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. Since 2016, Rosario has run half a dozen counseling groups of about eight to ten kids.

Why we should all think about the gamification of education

Neo LMS

There are many reasons behind high dropout rates , but many seem to stream from the same sources. It’s like students hop on a conveyor belt when they first enroll in an educational institution, then the system pushes them through various levels of difficulty — kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, high school, college — makes them collect diplomas, and drops them into adulthood and the employment market. And dropout rates will become a thing of the past.

Why educators are moving away from the Station Rotation model

The Christensen Institute

The Station Rotation has consistently reigned as the most popular blended-learning model implemented by elementary schools. Of the 235 active elementary schools currently profiled in the BLU school directory , 136, or 58 percent, of them have a Station Rotation program. Many educators, particularly at the elementary school level, have rotated students among centers or stations for decades.

OPINION: What health care can teach educators about the difference between ‘equal’ and ‘equitable’

The Hechinger Report

Equal treatment — giving the exact same service to everyone — isn’t the same thing as equitable treatment, which is providing what each child needs to meet a particular goal. What can we do about these dilemmas posed by a standardized system trying — and failing — to meet the needs of so many children? How might we shift to a personalized system that meets children where they are and gives them what they need, inside and outside of school, to thrive and succeed?

Erasing the Look and Feel of Poverty

Digital Promise

“Most of what our staff does is show up committed and dedicated — they really take care of these kids and make sure that they’re safe, that they’re healthy, that they’re happy, they’re eating, they have clothes,” says Amy Creeden, an elementary school principal. A new elementary school, Presidential Park, hosts more than 1,000 students in a modern, state-of-the-art building.

Erasing the Look and Feel of Poverty

Digital Promise

Most of what our staff does is show up committed and dedicated — they really take care of these kids and make sure that they’re safe, that they’re healthy, that they’re happy, they’re eating, they have clothes,” says Amy Creeden, an elementary school principal. A new elementary school, Presidential Park, hosts more than 1,000 students in a modern, state-of-the-art building. The initiative is in place at elementary and middle schools in Middletown.

In Puerto Rico, the odds are against high school grads who want to go to college

The Hechinger Report

Among the many other problems dragging down Puerto Rico’s stagnant economy, made worse by hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017, is a huge high school dropout rate and, among those students who do manage to graduate, a comparatively low trajectory to college — especially college on the mainland — and a high dropout rate there, too. Desirée Morales Díaz, who was accepted to American University but couldn’t afford to go there. “My My dad said, ‘I’ll just take two jobs.’

Adapting to the New Classroom

techlearning

Our elementary and middle schools utilize i-Ready diagnostics to form enrichment and intervention groups,” says Dr. Julia Lamons, assessment supervisor at Greene County Schools. The data provided allows teachers to group students intentionally for maximized learning opportunities. This technology solved another of the district’s biggest struggles—implementing an effective common assessment among 12 elementary and middle schools.

Urgency of getting people back to work gives new momentum to ?microcredentials?

The Hechinger Report

And if we lose someone, instead of being a dropout, they’ll have a certificate. But is it better than being a dropout? Related: Where education systems stumble, grassroots groups step in to raise success rates. So we’re thinking, let’s look at this natural behavior we’re seeing and let’s try to meet it instead of fighting it.”. HENDERSON, Nev. —

To transform your school district, look outside the mainstream

The Christensen Institute

Both are small, rural districts that first dipped their toes in the blended-learning space by offering online credit- or dropout-recovery programs to help students who were not succeeding in mainstream courses. Ultimately, I think VITAL made everyone aware in Putnam County that blended and personalized learning is the way to meet our students where they are.

Twenty-one and in high school

The Hechinger Report

This model demands more resources than those available to a traditional high school, but given that the typical high school dropout costs the state an estimated $300,000 over their lifetime , Cesene argues that the math is elementary. He realized that some students don’t succeed on the conventional academic path, and ran a school for dropouts on Arena Boulevard. She didn’t feel motivated at school, cutting class to meet with her boyfriend, usually to smoke pot.

With a teacher like me, ‘Would I have turned out better?’

The Hechinger Report

BE2T exists to meet these two needs. Fellows receive monthly stipends that start at $450 and rise each year, up to $700, in an attempt to combat steep post-secondary dropout rates — 33 percent of black college students drop out after one year of college, often because of financial shortfalls. “We’re Black students who have a black teacher in elementary school are more likely to graduate high school and go to college.

How to help struggling young readers

The Hechinger Report

This crucial juncture, and its far-reaching implications for those who don’t meet the mark, is why some educators are focusing their literacy efforts on the school years that come before third grade — hoping through innovation to offset what could be a terrible and lasting deficit in children’s reading skills. Taveras headed to her desk where five children were waiting to do small group work. Pull out your flashcards with the words ‘IS’ and ‘MY’,” she instructed the group.

5 Radical Schooling Ideas For An Uncertain Fall And Beyond

MindShift

A national survey by the advocacy group ParentsTogether found big gaps by income in the ability to access emergency learning. In pre-pandemic times, it offered a series of hourlong workshops to family members, mostly in low-income communities, coaching them to set goals and practice specific reading concepts with elementary school-age children. South Fort Myers High School follows a dropout prevention program called BARR, which stands for Building Assets, Reducing Risks.

Let Evidence Guide the Solutions to Student Absenteeism

edWeb.net

Research illuminates its impact: Elementary school students who miss 10% of school show weaker social skills development, lower reading ability, and higher grade-retention rates. Chronically absent middle schoolers have lower grades and test scores that increase dropout potential. FutureEd and Attendance Works, explained Jordan, studied evidence-based interventions that meet ESSA requirements. WATCH THE EDLEADER PANEL RECORDING. Students miss a school day now and then.

A year of personalized learning: Mistakes, moving furniture and making it work

The Hechinger Report

District officials theorized that students’ disillusionment with the curriculum contributed to Vista High’s 10 percent dropout rate. Vista school officials started by trying to replicate the academy’s intimate structure, in which four teachers shared the same group of 150 students and got a block of time each day to plan lessons together and review who needed additional help. And having small groups of teachers sharing the same students also paid academic dividends.