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Connecticut Gives Every Student a Computer and Home Internet to Close the Digital Divide

Edsurge

The impetus was really to close that achievement gap and that digital divide.” But even that wasn’t enough to completely close the divide, says Doug Casey, the executive director at the Connecticut Commission for Educational Technology, who heads the home broadband part of the program.

Technology overuse may be the new digital divide

The Hechinger Report

For years policymakers have fretted about the “digital divide,” that poor students are less likely to have computers and high-speed internet at home than rich students. The fear was, and is, that technology might cause achievement gaps between rich and poor students to grow if it’s easier for rich kids to use educational software, practice computer coding or learn about the world online. “It’s not a technology divide, it’s a content divide.

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Can BYOD Narrow the Digital Divide? #SXSWedu

EdTechSandyK

But we can use mobile devices to help. It''s becoming more socially acceptable to talk about school outside of school because of mobile devices. Studies have shown that low SES students test scores go up 30% when they have access to mobile devices. Surveys show low SES schools tend to have less access to technology and teachers integrate devices like cell phones at far lower rates. Notes from SXSWedu presentation by Dr. Michael Mills [link] Bit.ly/BYODResources

New Survey Reveals How Much Time Kids Really Spend on Mobile Devices

Edsurge

kids live in a house with some form of a mobile device—and those smartphones and tablets are gobbling up a greater portion of kids' screen time than ever. That’s one of the key findings in a just-released Common Sense Media survey tracking media habits among children aged 0-8, which also found a narrowing but significant digital divide among lower-income households, and the first signs that virtual reality and internet-connected toys are finding their way into American homes.

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Edtech Reports Recap: Video Is Eating the World, Broadband Fails to Keep Up

Edsurge

Connect All Students: How States and School Districts Can Close the Digital Divide” is a follow up to a June analysis by Boston Consulting Group and Common Sense. Nonprofit Common Sense has released a new survey and companion analysis about the 0-8 year-old set.

Report: One of the Biggest Obstacles to Remote Learning? Finding a Quiet Place to Work

Edsurge

Not all parents have the luxury of working from home, and many households lack sufficient technology to support their children’s online learning. Baker’s experience was reflected in the results of a survey sent by BrightBytes, an education data company, from April to June 15.

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Another Cause of Inequality: Slow Internet in Schools

Educator Innovator

Using digital tools in the classroom isn’t the future of learning, it’s the present—except at the significant percentage of schools without reliable high-speed internet. That was one frustrating situation Jean Tower recalls encountering when she started as director of technology at the Public Schools of Northborough and Southborough , Massachusetts, about six years ago. What was the promise of technology that everyone saw in the beginning for education?” By Heidi Moore.

COVID-19 Has Widened the ‘Homework Gap’ Into a Full-Fledged Learning Gap

Edsurge

Educators and digital equity advocates have tried a number of solutions to close the so-called “homework gap,” from deploying mobile hotspots to getting help from local businesses , but the problem has persisted. Indianapolis Public Schools distributed devices to students who lacked them, then ordered 1,500 mobile hotspots for those who also lacked reliable internet access. The digital divide, like so many issues in the U.S.,

2016 and Beyond: The Future of Classroom Technology by @MelanieNathan

TeacherCast

Widespread public interest surrounds new technologies in the classroom. With many communities anxious to enhance local school systems and increase opportunities for students, teachers and pupils, 2016 appears poised to witness a lot of exciting new developments in the world of education technology. One common theme in this movement concerns inspiring greater pupil engagement through the use of technology. Mobile Classrooms In Remote Locations.

LMS 90

The Pandemic Will Leave More Students Unprepared For College. Developmental Education Must Help.

Edsurge

This reality—combined with recent survey findings that metropolitan K-12 school districts are experiencing a 1-to-5 percent decline in student enrollments—is sure to negatively affect student success, college preparedness and workforce development.

Q&A: Tracy Smith on the Value of a Team Approach to Digital Equity

EdTech Magazine

Q&A: Tracy Smith on the Value of a Team Approach to Digital Equity. Parkland School District in Pennsylvania, like many of the nation’s public school systems, is seeing increases in student poverty rates and English language proficiency — trends that could make any existing digital divides worse. But Parkland school leaders are taking proactive steps to improve digital equity. EDTECH: What challenges related to digital equity are you facing in your district?

Close the Digital Learning Gap: How One District Tackled Tech Disparity in the Classroom

Edsurge

In 2014, Palmdale School District was experiencing a major digital divide. With 28 campuses spread across the Southern California district, each managing its own technology decisions, some schools regularly enjoyed the benefits of technology in the classroom, while those in higher poverty areas had minimal tech interaction, if any. In 2014, Palmdale School District was experiencing a major digital divide.

The changing geography of work: a new report

Bryan Alexander

McKinsey just published a new report, “The future of work in America: People and places, today and tomorrow” ( summary ; longer document ), looking ahead to 2030 after new technologies have had some impact. Let me identify what I see as the key bits for the future of higher education and technology. Automation technologies may widen these disparities at a time when workforce mobility is at historic lows. economics education and technology futures

Homework in a McDonald’s parking lot: Inside one mother’s fight to help her kids get an education during coronavirus

The Hechinger Report

The digital divide. It would be another month before Mississippi lawmakers and the state superintendent of education discussed the possibility of using a federal emergency relief package to purchase digital devices and hotspots for students. North Mississippi Public Service Commissioner Brandon Presley said the digital divide has hampered the ability of families to navigate the crisis. Terri Johnson willed her body not to show signs of impatience.

OPINION: The biggest danger to U.S. higher education? Losing 20 years’ worth of gains in access for first-generation and minority students

The Hechinger Report

A Strada Public Viewpoint survey released in June found that Black and Latino students are more likely than white students to have changed or canceled their education plans because of the pandemic. Increased campus technology assistance to students is also key.

Rural Healthcare Preparation Pipeline in Pennsylvania: Building Networks for Frontline Talent Development

Digital Promise

Beyond access, CSIU leaders identified social capital as the key component to postsecondary success and designed a mechanism to connect learners across disparate communities using technology. A March 2020 survey indicated that 90 percent of the students were somewhat or very satisfied with the content and number of text messages received from their adult learner programs. To address digital divide issues, classroom lessons are provided both online and with paper-based packets.

Young Children Are Spending Much More Time In Front Of Small Screens

MindShift

The nationally representative parent survey found that 98 percent of homes with children now have a mobile device — such as a tablet or smartphone. Mobile devices are now just as common as televisions in family homes. ” Other eye-grabbing highlights from the survey: 42 percent of young children now have their very own tablet device — up from 7 percent four years ago and less than 1 percent in 2011. The growth of mobile is a dramatic change.

Making Sense of the Common Sense Census

Gaggle Speaks

We were talking about how Gaggle and Common Sense Education could work together to draw attention to the need to teach Digital Citizenship and further protect students when they use school- or district-provided technology. Digital Citizenship is driver’s education, while products like Gaggle Safety Management are the safety equipment found in cars. Levine and Julián Castro who articulate their views on the digital divide within families, mobile media and digital equity.

A Tiny Microbe Upends Decades of Learning

The Hechinger Report

There is no one-size-fits-all remedy and no must-have suite of digital learning tools. But America’s persistent digital divide has greatly hampered efforts toward this goal. Now, in an effort to narrow the digital access gap, school leaders and community partners have devised a bevy of creative, albeit short-term, solutions. Having that digital backbone made the switch to distance learning nearly seamless — academically, at least. “We’re

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

In places like Albemarle County, where school officials estimate up to 20 percent of students lack home broadband, all the latest education-technology tools meant to narrow opportunity and achievement gaps can widen them instead. But a few pioneering districts have shown that it’s possible, and Albemarle County has joined a nascent trend of districts trying to build their own bridges across the digital divide. Related: Not all towns are created equal, digitally.

HOT QR Codes in the Classroom & Library

The Daring Librarian

A Quick Response (QR) code is a two-dimensional or 2D bar code which can be interpreted by any mobile phone with camera capabilities. Middle school teacher librarian Gwyneth Jones, aka the Daring Librarian , uses QR codes to engage students in what she calls “digital discoveries.” Because students work in groups or pairs, only about a third of the class needs Smartphones and because she’s done a student survey in advance she knows how much technology her students have.

The changing geography of work: a new report

Bryan Alexander

McKinsey just published a new report, “The future of work in America: People and places, today and tomorrow” ( summary ; longer document ), looking ahead to 2030 after new technologies have had some impact. Let me identify what I see as the key bits for the future of higher education and technology. Automation technologies may widen these disparities at a time when workforce mobility is at historic lows.

What’s Lost When Kids Are ‘Under-connected’ to the Internet?

MindShift

Ownership of mobile devices has grown swiftly since the introduction of the smartphone and has created more opportunities to connect to the Internet. Mobile devices have meant more Internet connectivity, but a closer look at how lower-income families use that access reveals the digital divide is still a problem. Technology and Learning in Lower-income Families, ” which was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Are educational videos leaving low-income students behind?

The Hechinger Report

One 2017 survey found that children under age 8 are spending 48 minutes on mobile devices a day in addition to two hours of television. Related: Technology overuse may be the new digital divide. Columnists Digital Digital Education Early Stories Jill Barshay News

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What New Research on Young Kids’ Media Use Means for Teachers

Graphite Blog

For educators, the survey data help us better understand what’s going on at home and can guide our thinking about the role teachers play in shaping students’ media use. Mobile Access Is Nearly Universal Perhaps it’s no surprise to learn that mobile device use has become nearly universal, with 98 percent of kids age 8 and under living in a home with some type of mobile device. Introduce digital citizenship skills early.

A guest post from AASL’s Banned Websites Awareness Day Committee

NeverEndingSearch

In 2014, ALA Washington’s Office for Information and Technology Policy (OITP) developed a helpful white paper to examine CIPA’s decade-long impact, Fencing Out Knowledge t h a t d e l i n e a t e d f o u r recommendations t o ALA: Increase awareness of the spectrum of filtering choices. Establish a digital repository of Internet filtering studies. Opportunities for authentic digital literacy instruction arise when students access social networking sites in educational settings.

Educating for Democracy in a Digital Age in Oakland

Educator Innovator

Their effort, called Educating for Democracy in a Digital Age (EDDA), is focused on designing and researching new approaches that take up the expanded civic opportunity structures that digital media afford and doing so while still maintaining a focus that builds on the basics to support youth to develop strong academic skills. EDDA is an effort to respond to new research and developing understandings about how politics has changed in the digital age.

Not all towns are created equal, digitally

The Hechinger Report

And their cash-strapped school district has struggled to provide them with even the most basic digital tools. million into schoolwide technology upgrades. It’s about helping students with limited tech skills be prepared for a global economy that is becoming increasingly digitized. One in five Greeley residents lives below the poverty level, and the school district is trying to upgrade its technology to give students an economic boost.

A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition)

Doug Levin

Questions that have been a long time coming… Otherwise, here’s what caught my eye this week – news, tools, and reports about education, public policy, technology, and innovation – including a little bit about why. Tagged on: April 1, 2017 Libraries have become a broadband lifeline to the cloud for students | Ars Technica → The role of the library in the digital age has grown thanks to cloud tools. This week, I introduced the K-12 Cyber Incident Map.

EdTech 150

A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition)

Doug Levin

Questions that have been a long time coming… Otherwise, here’s what caught my eye this week – news, tools, and reports about education, public policy, technology, and innovation – including a little bit about why. Tagged on: April 1, 2017 Libraries have become a broadband lifeline to the cloud for students | Ars Technica → The role of the library in the digital age has grown thanks to cloud tools. This week, I introduced the K-12 Cyber Incident Map.

EdTech 150

Will giving greater student access to smartphones improve learning?

The Hechinger Report

Because although technology and the wealth of information that it can provide has the potential to shrink achievement gaps, I am actually seeing the opposite take place within my classroom.”. “If If educators do not find ways to leverage mobile technology in all learning environments, for all students, then we are failing our kids by not adequately preparing them to make the connection between their world outside of school and their world inside school.”.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

For the past ten years, I have written a lengthy year-end series, documenting some of the dominant narratives and trends in education technology. The organization, which was founded in 1994, was best known for its annual Horizon Report, its list of predictions about the near-future of education technology. It’s not that paying for a piece of technology will treat you any better, mind you.). It’s that their parents are opting them out of exposure to these technologies.