Remove Digital Divide Remove Elementary Remove Mobility Remove Technology

3 steps we’re taking to ensure true digital equity

eSchool News

Across the nation, school districts are investing in one-to-one computing programs and supplying digital devices for their students to use as learning tools. We want to make sure all of our students, even those from the poorest homes, can contribute to our digital future.

10 steps for bringing connectivity home

eSchool News

This fall, Cypress-Fairbanks (TX) Independent School District is particularly excited about welcoming back 150 of our underserved elementary, middle, and high school students after they’ve enjoyed their first full summer of district-sponsored Wi-Fi.

Another Cause of Inequality: Slow Internet in Schools

Educator Innovator

Using digital tools in the classroom isn’t the future of learning, it’s the present—except at the significant percentage of schools without reliable high-speed internet. A teacher at an elementary school in a Boston suburb leads students through a story creation session using Pixie.

Not all towns are created equal, digitally

The Hechinger Report

And their cash-strapped school district has struggled to provide them with even the most basic digital tools. million into schoolwide technology upgrades. It’s about helping students with limited tech skills be prepared for a global economy that is becoming increasingly digitized.

13 Websites That Provide Lots of Digital Books for Summer Reading

Ask a Tech Teacher

At the beginning of the 21st century, the definition of digital equity revolved around the provision of a digital device to every student. Books can be read online or on most mobile devices. You can read them online, on a mobile device, or download them.

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

In places like Albemarle County, where school officials estimate up to 20 percent of students lack home broadband, all the latest education-technology tools meant to narrow opportunity and achievement gaps can widen them instead. Related: Not all towns are created equal, digitally.

Digital Equity: It’s More Than Just Student Access

techlearning

Digital equity is one of the most complex and urgent issues facing 21st-century educators. Digital equity is one of the most complex and urgent issues facing 21st-century educators. Amesse Elementary at Denver Public Schools. Amesse Elementary.

Distraction 2 Reaction: BYOT (BYOD) Success!

EdTechSandyK

Notes from TCEA 2012 Presentation by Eanes ISD Tech Group and Carl Hooker, Director of Instructional Technology, Eanes ISD Presentation posted at: edtech.eanesisd.net/tcea Research Behind BYOT 2011 Horizon Report K12 Edition - Published every year. Publicizes key trends and challenges and predictions for adoption educational technology. Support of the technologies we use are becoming more cloud based than server based. have a mobile phone. 80+% have mobile phones.

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Learning Revolution Free PD - Angela Maiers Tonight - LOTS of 2014 Global Education Conference Updates - Proposal Deadline, Keynotes, and Volunteering

The Learning Revolution Has Begun

AIR was established in order to address the critical need for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) infrastructure and training at school level in Ghana. Sunday, October 19th - Saturday, October 25th Digital Citizenship Week , Join us for Digital Citizenship Week and engage students, teachers, and families in your community in thinking critically, behaving safely, and participating responsibly online. What can colleges do to help foster strong digital citizens?

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

” Via DelawareOnline : “The first step to reducing violence among young people is to have police officers assigned to elementary and middle schools, says a coalition of state officials, education administrators and police.” Humphrey testified that he hired Hubbard on a $7,500-per-month consulting contract to connect him to legislative leaders in other states, as Edgenuity tried to sell digital courses.” Education Politics.

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