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WANRack commits to closing the digital divide

Education Superhighway

Over the past eight years, WANRack has worked with schools and communities to close the digital divide and ensure students have access to digital learning in every classroom, every day. With the increasing use of technology as a tool for learning, students and teachers need more than basic connectivity. With that in mind, WANRack announced their continued commitment to unlocking digital learning opportunities across the country.

Digital divide hits small towns hard

eSchool News

In New Mexico, educators and policymakers are working to close the digital opportunity gap. Unfortunately, the digital divide is a very real barrier to success in our community,” said Audra Bluehouse, an English teacher at Hatch Valley High. “We The Hatch Valley schools receive the FCC’s E-Rate initiative, which reimburses schools and libraries for expenses related to internet access. Next page: What policymakers are doing to close the digital divide.

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How E-rate Has Made High-Speed Connectivity Possible in Public Schools

Education Superhighway

In 2014, the Federal Communications Commission modernized the E-rate program with the objective of closing the K-12 digital divide within five years. As a result, 35 million more students have been connected to digital learning and educational opportunity. The impact of E-rate modernization is most evident in the acceleration of the pace of upgrades in K-12 broadband networks. Why has E-rate modernization worked so well?

Massachusetts is taking action to improve the digital divide in classrooms across the state

Education Superhighway

One year ago we launched the Massachusetts Digital Connections Initiative in partnership with Governor Baker’s Office, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE), and MassIT. Since the initiative launched, EducationSuperHighway and our state partners have focused our efforts on ensuring that every student in Massachusetts gets the bandwidth necessary to support digital learning in the classroom.

Rural Broadband Month: Encouraging Equal Access to Digital Learning

Education Superhighway

Throughout this month, the FCC will encourage particular focus on issues surrounding digital access in America’s rural communities. Equal digital access is important everywhere in America, for all students. Rural schools are the primary reason that the E-rate program exists, as they are the least servedand have the most need – their students. The meeting will address policies aimed to bridge the digital divide.

Rural Broadband Month: Encouraging Equal Access to Digital Learning

Education Superhighway

Throughout this month, the FCC will encourage particular focus on issues surrounding digital access in America’s rural communities. Equal digital access is important everywhere in America, for all students. Rural schools are the primary reason that the E-rate program exists, as they are the least served and have the most need – their students. The meeting will address policies aimed to bridge the digital divide.

Digital equity bill targets ‘homework gap’

eSchool News

Proposed legislation would ensure students have access to digital learning resources, internet outside of school. New legislation introduced in Congress would support “innovative strategies and methods to increase out-of-school access to digital learning resources” in an effort to boost both student and educator engagement. The Digital Learning Equity Act of 2015 , introduced by Rep. “The Digital Learning Equity Act of 2015 (H.R.

Education in the Era of COVID-19: Why Connection Matters

Digital Promise

With digital learning likely to stretch into the fall due to COVID-19, how can we ensure every student has equitable access to powerful learning opportunities? The Equity Gap and Digital Divide Creates a Disconnect for School Districts.

3 Resources to Help Connect Students and Families

Digital Promise

When Howard-Suamico School District went digital, giving every student in grades 3 and up tablets or laptops, the change was immediate and dramatic. Students were excited about learning. “What you find out very quickly as teachers is not just the power of using technology in the classroom, but the power to extend learning, to carry it beyond just the school day,” says Brian Nicol, communications coordinator and, until recently, a teacher at the Wisconsin school district.

Developing Systems for Effective, Equitable Education for All Students

edWeb.net

It’s a common story: the energetic principal who comes into a school, revamps the curriculum, creates innovative learning practices, and then leaves with no sustainability plan. First, districts need to address the digital divide/homework gap in meaningful ways. By Stacey Pusey.

New Report Highlights How Close Are We To Closing the Connectivity Gap

Education Superhighway

Since EducationSuperHighway began, creating digital learning opportunities for all children has motivated us to ensure that digital equity is a nationwide reality in our education system. million teachers have reached or exceeded the minimum recommended connectivity level for digital learning. 5 million students remain on the wrong side of the digital divide, still lacking access to high-speed Internet. Why Digital Equity Matters.

Nearly all American classrooms can now connect to high-speed internet, effectively closing the “connectivity divide”

The Hechinger Report

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every other Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. Sign up for the Future of Learning newsletter. Future of Learning. Mississippi Learning. And Marwell wants all of them to experience the types of teaching and learning high-speed internet access facilitates.

98 Percent of U.S. Public School Districts Connected to High-Speed Broadband, But 2.3 Million Students Still Left Behind

Education Superhighway

At the same time, the report cites the urgent need to close the digital divide for 2.3 million students across the nation who lack access to the minimum connectivity required for digital learning. million teachers in more than 81,000 schools have the Internet access they need for digital learning. billion in E-rate funds set to expire in 2019. The fast-paced learning environment must not be slowed by insufficient broadband.”

A Call to Action: How Governors Can Solve the School Connection Crisis

Education Superhighway

A new school year means new opportunities, ambitious learning goals, and heightened prospects for kids, but for millions of our nation’s students, those opportunities come with an asterisk. Lack of high-speed Internet prevents teachers and students from taking full advantage of the transformational power of digital learning and leaves millions of kids on the wrong side of the digital divide.

Report: 41 percent of schools are under-connected

eSchool News

This kind of connectivity is necessary, the authors note, to help connect students to high-quality digital learning opportunities. It also highlights state leaders who have helped their states put these digital learning opportunities directly in front of teachers and students. Twelve states said they are thinking about coordinating statewide consortia for the E-rate’s new wi-fi funding.

?New Report Spells Out How to Connect 6.5M Students in Schools Without Internet

Edsurge

The digital divide is showing real signs of narrowing—but there are still 6.5 million students in under-connected schools, according to a new report by the nonprofit EducationSuperHighway , which analyzes data from E-rate applications. Overall, more than 39 million students enjoy bandwidth speeds to support digital learning. We have seen a real change in the FCC approval rates for these projects.

The Politics of Education Technology

Hack Education

Challenges to accreditation and certification and the steady drumbeat of “everyone should learn to code” are connected to politics as well as to the business of ed-tech. E-Rate has been, since the origin of the fund in 1996, the main way in which schools and libraries were supposedly guaranteed “reasonable rates” on telecommunications services. million in E-Rate rebates.).