Remove Data Remove Digital Divide Remove Mobility Remove Social Media

Debunking 3 myths about BYOD in the classroom

Neo LMS

Not long ago, mobile devices were considered perfect for any past-time activity, and had no place in the classroom. Students can play games, watch stupid videos, browse inappropriate websites, spend time on social media, or catch up on the latest episodes of their favorite series.

BYOD 396

Students Size Up Edtech’s Dark Side

Edsurge

Read part 1 , part 2 (about audio) , part 3 (about video) , and part 4 (about mobile tech in education). When students in my graduate seminar on education technology were given the chance to select a topic for a class session, they wanted to devote time to the digital world’s dark side.

EdTech 156

A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition)

Doug Levin

Wish there were publicly available data to support this claim. Tagged on: April 2, 2017 Exclusive: Pisa data may be 'incomparable' | tes → Falls in Asian high-flyers' math scores could simply be down to switch to computer tests.

EdTech 195

A Thinking Person’s Guide to EdTech News (2017 Week 13 Edition)

Doug Levin

Wish there were publicly available data to support this claim. Tagged on: April 2, 2017 Exclusive: Pisa data may be 'incomparable' | tes → Falls in Asian high-flyers' math scores could simply be down to switch to computer tests.

EdTech 195

A hidden, public internet asset that could get more kids online for learning

The Hechinger Report

This asset was handed to [school districts and educational nonprofits] with the expectation that they deliver educational and social value in return. This issue [the ‘homework gap’] constitutes a new civil right: the right to digital equity.”.

Will giving greater student access to smartphones improve learning?

The Hechinger Report

And when I peer into classrooms, I see students tuning out their peers and teachers and focusing instead on YouTube and social media. He also wrote that much “student disruption and conflict centers around cell phones in schools and ease of access to social media.”.

Educating for Democracy in a Digital Age in Oakland

Educator Innovator

Their effort, called Educating for Democracy in a Digital Age (EDDA), is focused on designing and researching new approaches that take up the expanded civic opportunity structures that digital media afford and doing so while still maintaining a focus that builds on the basics to support youth to develop strong academic skills. EDDA is an effort to respond to new research and developing understandings about how politics has changed in the digital age.