New, MIT-based program proposes transforming physicists, engineers into teachers

The Hechinger Report

The “Great Dome” on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which is hosting an experimental program to recruit physicists, engineers, chemists, linguists, biologists, neuroscientists and other experts and train them to be primary and secondary school teachers. This experiment, just getting under way, is called the Woodrow Wilson Academy of Teaching and Learning, named for the foundation that is underwriting it. Sign up for the Future of Learning newsletter.

Transforming Physicists, Engineers into Teachers at New MIT Program

MindShift

So he’s joined a pioneering program based at MIT to take people like him, with experience in high-demand fields such as engineering, physics, math, languages, biology and neuroscience, and transform them into teachers. This experiment, just getting under way, is called the Woodrow Wilson Academy of Teaching and Learning, named for the foundation that is underwriting it. Classes are provided both online and in person, supervised by a small faculty the academy calls “mentors.”

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Will “school choice on steroids” get a boost under a Trump administration?

The Hechinger Report

The logical extension of such policies – permitting students to take individual courses wherever they wish, by using online options – has already begun to take root in about a dozen states. Under such plans, the funding for a course taken by an individual student goes to the school or online company offering the course, often away from the student’s local district. His school, with 400 students, can manage it partly because no more than 40 students a year are taking an online class.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

In 2012, Pearson, Cengage Learning, and Macmillan Higher Education sued Boundless Learning, claiming that the open education textbook startup had “stolen the creative expression of their authors and editors, violating their intellectual-property rights.” Online Grade Portals.