Teaching in the Era of Bots: Students Need Humans Now More Than Ever

Edsurge

In this context, educators must be especially mindful that our uses of technology do not undermine meaningful learning. Relationships underpin all of the “Big Six” experiences, which include “a professor who made me excited about learning” and “professors who cared about me as a person.” In one study , students were not told which of their teaching assistants were humans and which were robots—and findings suggested students struggled to differentiate the two. (I

WHAT’S NEW: NEW TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS

techlearning

www.getalma.com ) Alma Technologies has announced it is allowing any SQL-based business intelligence tool, such as Tableau and Jaspersoft, to access data from its modern, student information system and learning management system. BLACKBOARD ALLY ( www.blackboard.com ) Blackboard announced that Blackboard Ally is now available for multiple learning management systems used by K-12 school districts. Software & Online ALMA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

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Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

monthly subsidies toward cellular phone service or mobile broadband. ” Via Inside Higher Ed : “A bill backed by President Trump and announced Wednesday aims to reduce overall legal immigration by half while putting in place a new points-based system for applicants for employment-based green cards that would privilege graduates of American universities.” Spoiler alert: it’s about learning how to teach differently.). Robots and Other Ed-Tech SF.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

In 2012, Pearson, Cengage Learning, and Macmillan Higher Education sued Boundless Learning, claiming that the open education textbook startup had “stolen the creative expression of their authors and editors, violating their intellectual-property rights.” Boundless’s materials have been archived by David Wiley’s company Lumen Learning. The greatest trick the ed-tech devil ever played was convincing people that clicking was “active learning.”)