Competency Based Learning: How Flipped Mastery Makes CBL Possible

Turning Learning On Its Head

During the 2007-2008 school year, Aaron Sams and I pioneered the flipped class model of education. Though the flipped class model proved to be an effective strategy in which we saw increases in student achievement and engagement, we only did the traditional flipped classroom for one year.

How to Bring ‘Mastery Learning’ to the Classroom

Edsurge

One of the most popular topics these days in education is mastery learning—the idea that the pace of a class should match what each student is ready to learn, as a way to ensure they’re really grasping material. Tell us a little about how you taught.

6 Ways Technology Can Reinvent Parent-Teacher Conferences

Edsurge

But conferences would not make it on my Top Ten Reasons I Like to Teach list. This is how they act in class. This is what they should be doing to improve.” And it lacks the enthusiasm—as well as the desire to help kids own and engage in their learning—that defines us as innovative educators. In fact, we should use this technology to our advantage and add more ways that teachers and parents can work together face-to-face in helping every student succeed.

How Improving Student Feedback and Teaching Data Science Restored Our Classroom Culture

Edsurge

Over winter break in 2015, I found myself scouring the internet for career alternatives that would take me out of the classroom. and I was feeling isolated in a room with students who didn’t seem to want to engage with my class, despite all my efforts to bring enthusiasm and passion to my work. The learning environment was tense, my students were angsty and I didn't have the information or strategies to make it better.

Data 131

Why Flipped Learning Is Still Going Strong 10 Years Later

Edsurge

It was the early days of YouTube (then two-years old), and it was getting cheap and easy to make and post videos, so the two teachers—Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams—proposed shifting lectures to videos students would watch at home, and asking students to come to class prepared to problem solve with their peers. It became know as the flipped classroom—a modern, video-based version of a model pioneered by a handful of higher ed professors during the 1990s.