4 Digital learning trends for Higher Education

Neo LMS

Higher Education (HE) has significantly lagged behind other industries on the road to digitization. Despite the growing demand for edtech and online learning, face-to-face lectures and on-campus activities remained the core part of how students accessed their education.

Trends 299

Four Signs It’s Time for Micro-credentials

Digital Promise

Studies suggest American schools invest $18 billion in teachers’ professional learning annually. And while teachers are also learning in informal ways, existing systems don’t track or make the most of that growth. . Enter micro-credentials : competency-based recognition for educator learning that is supported by digital badges. Four recent developments have set the stage for micro-credentials: #1 – Competency-based learning for students.

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How micro-credentials could have a chance

eSchool News

The study, from nonprofit ed-tech advocacy group Digital Promise and consulting firm Grunwald Associates, takes a detailed look at how teachers say they feel about professional development and competency-based micro-credentials. New survey delves into how teachers would use micro-credentials and examines how widely-known the concept is.

Micro-credentials: A Promising Way to Put Educators’ Skills Front and Center

Digital Promise

Brent Maddin is the Provost at the Relay Graduate School of Education, Director of TeacherSquared, and a member of the Digital Promise Micro-credential Advisory Board. In contrast, imagine a world where educators may be immediately and widely recognized for specific knowledge, skills, and mindsets that they demonstrate in transparent, competency-based ways. Through this design work, we’re learning a few lessons: We need to support anywhere, anytime learning.

Micro-credentials: A Promising Way to Put Educators’ Skills Front and Center

Digital Promise

Brent Maddin is the Provost at the Relay Graduate School of Education, Director of TeacherSquared, and a member of the Digital Promise Micro-credential Advisory Board. In contrast, imagine a world where educators may be immediately and widely recognized for specific knowledge, skills, and mindsets that they demonstrate in transparent, competency-based ways. Through this design work, we’re learning a few lessons: We need to support anywhere, anytime learning.

Digital Age Skills for Educators

Educator Innovator

Learning to read, write, and participate in the digital world has become the 4th basic foundational skill next to the three Rs—reading, writing, and arithmetic—in a rapidly evolving, networked world. In the 21st century, learning can take place anytime, anywhere, at any pace, and with the learner at the center. Finally, Mozilla is making sure to document lessons learned for broader reach and information back to interested stakeholders.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

The implication, according to one NYT article : “the digital gap between rich and poor kids is not what we expected.” The real digital divide, this article contends, is not that affluent children have access to better and faster technologies. (Um, Badges.