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Public Edtech Companies Have Been Rare. These SPACs Will Change That.

Edsurge

Publicly traded education technology companies are rare. as the remaining trio of prominent edtech companies on the U.S. CLAS.U), a special purpose acquisition company headed by CEO Michael Moe, raised $225 million in its IPO. edtech startups raised $2.2

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Crises and Capital: The Top Edtech Business Stories of 2020

Edsurge

Here is a recap of the biggest and most popular edtech business stories of 2020. The maker of the Canvas learning management system, which went public in 2015, announced a $2-billion offer from private equity firm Thoma Bravo last December. to Recreate In-Person Learning, Online.

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Why We Don't Need a 'Netflix for Education'

Edsurge

If the views expressed by leading edtech companies are any indication, the race to become the first 'Netflix of Education' is gathering steam. Comments from both established learning companies like McGraw-Hill , as well as more recent entrants like D2L and Udemy , reveal a strong push among edtech companies seeking to position themselves as "education's answer to Netflix." prefer instructional formats that produce inferior learning outcomes.

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Quizlet Just Raised $30M at a $1 Billion Valuation. But Don’t Call It a Unicorn.

Edsurge

Unicorns don’t exist, except as an analogy for private companies supposedly worth at least $1 billion. But Glotzbach’s point is that camels are hardy and steady—just as he hopes his company can be. Recent US edtech “unicorns”. Udemy ( $2B ).

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The Business of 'Ed-Tech Trends'

Hack Education

When I first started working as a tech reporter, I assumed – naively – that venture capitalists were smart people who did thorough research before funding a company. I assumed that they looked to see if the company could do what it promised – financially, technologically. Its founder, Elizabeth Holmes, dropped out of Stanford to start the company when she was just 19. The companies that raised the most money this year: BYJU’s (tutoring): $540 million.

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

” A ruling from the Court of Justice of the European Union raises interesting questions about the ownership of student data : “Exam scripts and examiner’s corrections are personal data of the exam candidate.” ” Via The New York Times : “DeVos Abandons Plan to Allow One Company to Service Federal Student Loans.” ” Not sure why these are the four, but there you go: Udemy , Lynda , Coursera , and Skillshare.