The History of the Future of E-rate

Hack Education

While much of the speculation about the future of education technology under President Trump has been focused on the new Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos ( her investment in various ed-tech companies , her support for vouchers and charter schools), it’s probably worth remembering that the Department of Education is hardly the only agency that shapes education and education technology policy. What can E-rate tell us about the relationship between politics and ed-tech?

After Net Neutrality, Experts Expect Changes to FCC’s E-Rate

Edsurge

But the tea leaves for E-Rate are pretty positive actually. John Harrington, Funds for Learning Among the groups commenting on the issue, both ISTE and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) raised the possibility that digital education providers can pay to deliver their content more quickly, and wondered aloud if the move would deepen the digital divide. Since it began in the 1990s, E-Rate has helped bring high-speed internet access to 97 percent of U.S.

Major Telecom Sprint Pledges to Bring Web Connectivity to 1 Million Students

Marketplace K-12

history to bridge the digital divide.”. The company’s effort comes as policymakers at the federal level and school advocates are calling for greater focus on addressing the so-called homework gap. The company and its foundation also say they will raise money through special events, and donation of devices, and other activities. Sprint’s leadership wanted to marshal its resources behind “one cause that really made sense for us a company,” he added.

3 Resources to Help Connect Students and Families

Digital Promise

When Howard-Suamico School District went digital, giving every student in grades 3 and up tablets or laptops, the change was immediate and dramatic. That’s where it really exacerbates the divide.” “If you didn’t have Internet access outside of school, you could learn in my class, but boy would it be at a different pace and rate and difficulty,” he says. In December, the district won a $15,000 grant from Cellcom, a local cellphone company.

?New Report Spells Out How to Connect 6.5M Students in Schools Without Internet

Edsurge

The digital divide is showing real signs of narrowing—but there are still 6.5 million students in under-connected schools, according to a new report by the nonprofit EducationSuperHighway , which analyzes data from E-rate applications. Overall, more than 39 million students enjoy bandwidth speeds to support digital learning. We have seen a real change in the FCC approval rates for these projects.

State Leadership Working Towards Broadband Access for All

edWeb.net

Many times, the funding is not enough, and schools supplement from outside sources, including the E-Rate program. There are no cap limits, no throttle rates, and no chastising schools when they need extra bandwidth.

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

Some internet-access advocates say EBS is underutilized at best, and wasted at worst, because loose regulatory oversight by the FCC has allowed most of the spectrum to fall into the hands of commercial internet companies. Related: Not all towns are created equal, digitally.

A guest post from AASL’s Banned Websites Awareness Day Committee

NeverEndingSearch

In a nutshell, CIPA requires that schools and libraries receiving E-Rate funding “block or filter Internet access to pictures that are: (a) obscene; (b) child pornography; or (c) harmful to minors (for computers that are accessed by minors).” Establish a digital repository of Internet filtering studies. Opportunities for authentic digital literacy instruction arise when students access social networking sites in educational settings. Digital Citizenship by OSAPAC.

The Politics of Education Technology

Hack Education

“ Facebook Is Not a Technology Company ,” media studies professor Ian Bogost also wrote in August. If that’s what “technology” means, then every company is in the technology business – a useless distinction. …There are companies that are firmly planted in the computing sector. The most interesting thing about companies like Alphabet, Amazon, and Facebook is that they are not (computing) technology companies.