Remove Company Remove Coursera Remove Digital Badges Remove Meeting

As the Microcredential Market Booms, Don’t Forget the Learner

Edsurge

At least 20 percent of American colleges now offer badges—non-credit and for-credit credentials that capture specific competencies, from coding to oral communication. One in five employers report that they have hired someone with a verified certificate from a platform such as Coursera or EdX.

Employer Credentials and Community Colleges: A Look Behind Google’s IT Support Certificate Program

Edsurge

Despite their often limited budgets, the innovative nature and adaptability of community colleges makes them well-positioned to meet the training needs for aspiring tech professionals. Many tech firms are even going directly to professionals with their own certificates and credentials—such as IBM’s digital badge program , Hubspot’s certifications , and long-running programs like Microsoft’s IT certifications.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

Without revenue the company will go away. Or the company will have to start charging for the software. Or it will raise a bunch of venture capital to support its “free” offering for a while, and then the company will get acquired and the product will go away. (It’s Badges.

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

That seems to be Coursera ’s business model. Via Edsurge : “As LinkedIn ’s Video Library Grows, Company Says It Has No Plans to Compete With Colleges.” Via The New York Times : “ Climate Science Meets a Stubborn Obstacle: Students.” “ Digital Badges Are Gaining Traction,” according to MIndwire Consulting’s Michael Feldstein. That’s despite privacy concerns about the company. Education Politics.

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

“In a sweeping move, the for-profit school chain has been told to lock its doors after parliament demanded it halt operations in response to its failure to meet educational and infrastructure standards.” ” The company – funded by Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, Pearson, Learn Capital, and others – says it will remain open. Via the Coursera blog : “Coming soon to all courses: Flexible session-based schedules.” Education Politics.

MOOC 50