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How Much Screen Time Is Too Much for Kids?

Edsurge

The digital divide between rich and poor students isn’t what it used to be. Anya Kamenetz, journalist and author , “The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life” : I'm not seeing any trend away from devices in the classroom. And sometimes that’s going be a digital tool. But the fact that it's digital doesn't make it good or bad. That context seems to be missing in our Twitter-verse right now.

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The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

The implication, according to one NYT article : “the digital gap between rich and poor kids is not what we expected.” The real digital divide, this article contends, is not that affluent children have access to better and faster technologies. (Um,

Education Technology's Inequalities

Hack Education

Don’t Believe “Don’t Be Evil” My own concerns about the direction of education technology cannot be separated from my concerns with digital technologies more broadly. Indeed, the World Bank issued a report in January arguing that digital technologies – not just robots in factories – stand to widen inequalities as well, “and even hasten the hollowing out of middle-class employment.” Education Technology and Digital Polarization.