Remove BYOD Remove Digital Divide Remove Education Remove Mobility

Digital Divide 2.0: a few facts and figures

Neo LMS

Today we launch right in with a topic that is on the minds and hearts of many teachers – the “digital divide”; that silent, pernicious socioeconomic gap between students that have and students that do not have access to technology. Technology is transforming education, the change is as inevitable as that which the printing press brought to education. Digital divide: facts and figures. Income vs. Access: The Digital Divide in the US.

Top 10 BYOD concerns — and how to overcome them [Part 1]

Neo LMS

BYOD at school is more than the latest buzz phrase you hear at every corner of the teacher’s rooms or along school hallways. More and more schools adopt BYOD policies and allow students to bring their own mobile phones, tablets, eBooks, and other devices in the classroom, and use them as tools to enhance learning. But failure BYOD stories exist as well, and they rarely hit the headlines as often. Top 10 BYOD concerns: 1. BYOD deepens the digital divide.

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The Device Conundrum - 1:1 vs BYOD

A Principal's Reflections

As we continue to advance in the digital age schools and districts are beginning to re-think pedagogy and learning environments by instituting either 1:1 device programs or Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiatives. It is tough to argue the potential impact of either program that is implemented diligently and with a focus on learning that will not result in the enhancement of essential skills sets that our students need to succeed in today''s digital world.

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Debunking 3 myths about BYOD in the classroom

Neo LMS

BYOD — Bring Your Own Device — has gained some momentum in today’s education system. From temp teachers to entire school districts, more and more educational staff debate about or seriously consider the adoption of BYOD in their instruction. Not long ago, mobile devices were considered perfect for any past-time activity, and had no place in the classroom. Adopting BYOD in schools seems like a win-win situation. Myth No 2: BYOD is not safe.

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Top 10 BYOD concerns — and how to overcome them [Part 2]

Neo LMS

In the last week’s post I promised to address exactly 10 BYOD concerns that keep schools reluctant to allowing students to use their mobile devices in the classroom. However, here’s a refresher of the previous post and the five BYOD concerns that are already put on the table: BYOD deepens the digital divide; BYOD will distract students; BYOD encourages students to cheat; Students might forget to bring/charge their devices; Parents may need to pay more for BYOD.

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50 Shades of Mobile

The Mobile Native

SMCS Mobile Learning Technology 2. The Mobile Learning Portal 3. Cybrary Man''s Mobile Learning Page 5. 100 Mobile Tools for Teachers 6. Go Mobile 4 Learning 8. iPads in Education Wiki 16. Mobile Learning Integration 17. iPad in Education Resources Worth Exploring 20. i Educational Apps Review 23. The Mobile Native 26. The Mobile Learner 27. Going Mobile 28. Mobile Learning 29. Mobile ESL 31.

Distraction 2 Reaction: BYOT (BYOD) Success!

EdTechSandyK

Compilation of research by respected educational technologists across the nation. Publicizes key trends and challenges and predictions for adoption educational technology. Key trends from 2011 : People expect anytime anywhere access Resources becoming more cloud based Abundance of resources make it more challenging for us to function in the role of educator as we know it. Digital media literacy continues to rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession.

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Why cellphones belong in our classrooms

eSchool News

The New York City Department of Education’s recent decision to lift the cellphone ban in schools—a decision I support—acknowledges and affirms this notion. Hudson HSLT is a digitally-focused and device-agnostic one-to-one computing school; we look at technology as a support for teaching and learning. Day-to-day, our teachers might use mobile devices in class for their daily drop-everything-and-read (DEAR) activity or to let students work on their class blogging assignments.

Technology won't replace teachers, but.

Learning with 'e's

Both events had several common threads, including the new roles of education professionals, the impact of technology on education and the ways students are appropriating new tools to support their learning. As the #lilac13 Twitter stream will reveal, there were lively and protracted debates around the changing nature of library spaces, the nature of knowledge, the future of books and reading, and the impact of digital media.

Will giving greater student access to smartphones improve learning?

The Hechinger Report

These sometimes overlapping groups include students receiving free or reduced-priced lunch, African-American students, English Language Learners and special education students. If educators do not find ways to leverage mobile technology in all learning environments, for all students, then we are failing our kids by not adequately preparing them to make the connection between their world outside of school and their world inside school.”. Digital Education K-12 News