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The messy reality of personalized learning

The Hechinger Report

In one class, Danusis introduces me to a lanky child in rain boots, who clicks through an online math program while chatting about a baby goat that’s being weaned in her backyard. In another room, children rotate through learning stations, sometimes at screens, sometimes putting pencils to paper. Danusis and her teaching staff practice personalized learning, an individual-comes-first approach, usually aided by laptops, that has become a reformist calling card in education.

Tipping point: Can Summit put personalized learning over the top?

The Hechinger Report

(From left to right) Sixth graders Mia DeMore, Maria DeAndrade, and Stephen Boulas make a number line in their math class at Walsh Middle School in Framingham, Massachusetts, one of 132 “Basecamp” schools piloting the Personalized Learning Platform created by the Summit charter school network. Some passionately believe that it can and must, while skeptics fear that personalized-learning hype has outpaced research into if and, importantly, how it helps students.

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Is the new education reform hiding in plain sight?

The Hechinger Report

Their changed view — and that of others who shunned Rogers and now want in — is driven by what seems to be a magic educational elixir: personalized learning. Philanthropists, state education officials, reform advocates — even charter school leaders — are examining personalized learning. But personalized learning raises big questions about educational equity. Could personalized learning spur an even more splintered society? Dan D.

Blended learning proof points showcase district schools

The Christensen Institute

Public school districts began innovating with blended learning before most charter schools. According to surveys that Brian Bridges has conducted in multiple states, including California where blended learning is growing rapidly, more school districts utilize blended learning than do charter schools. And the pace of innovation with blended learning is picking up within school districts nationwide.

Movie magic could be used to translate for the deaf

The Hechinger Report

About three quarters of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in America are mainstreamed, learning alongside hearing students in schools and classes where sign-language interpreters are often in short supply. That reading deficit slows their learning in every other subject. You can’t just make an animated phrase book.”. You can’t just make an animated phrase book. Sign up for our Blended Learning newsletter. Read more about Blended Learning.

A charter chain thinks it has the answer for alternative schools

The Hechinger Report

What you learn in a regular high school in a year, you could learn here in six months.”. Like many alternative schools, The Charter School of San Diego allows students behind on credits to complete courses online at an accelerated pace. While credit recovery is one of the fastest-growing fields in online education, many programs are little more than diploma mills hastening students through the curriculum with insufficient support.

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The Learning Revolution Has Begun

The Learning Revolution Weekly Update April 15th The very existence of libraries affords the best evidence that we may yet have hope for the future of man. Eliot The technologies of the Internet and the Web are reshaping where, when, and from whom we learn--and even how we think about learning. The Learning Revolution Project highlights our own virtual and physical events and those of our more than 200 partners. The Learning Revolution Conference schedule is now up!

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Education's Online Futures

Hack Education

This is part six of my annual look at the year’s “ top ed-tech stories ” Some of the most oft-told tales in education in recent years have the following plot: the students all move from “brick-and-mortar” to “online.” Clayton Christensen and Michael Horn, for example, predicted in their 2008 book Disrupting Class that by 2019 half of all high school classes would be taught via the Internet. ” Online Education and Teaching Labor.

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