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The 2017 EdNext Poll on School Reform: Digital Learning

Doug Levin

I have been critical of the treatment of technology in both the 2015 and 2016 Education Next back-to-school polls for a variety of reasons, including sloppiness in reporting, bias, and lack of relevance to education policy and practice considerations. Among other issues, the authors of those polls suffered from trying to make too much of the single (questionably framed) technology-related question they fielded.

State and District Leadership Discuss Digital Learning Opportunities

edWeb.net

SETDA’s latest research, Navigating the Digital Shift 2018: Broadening Student Learning Opportunities , highlights how state policies are supporting the transformation to digital learning. Of course, schools can’t make the switch to digital overnight.

Do We Need New Regulations to Govern the Use of EdTech?

Doug Levin

Largely unexamined in the large-scale shift to digital learning in education are the accompanying ethical considerations. Indeed, the issues and tradeoffs that school leaders and teachers face in using technology in schools and for education — whether free or for a fee — are more complex than they have ever been. What restrictions, if any, should be placed on school district re-use and sharing of student and teacher work? Conflicts of interest.

EdTech 150

Data Interoperability: Beyond Accountability and Reporting

edWeb.net

This new role for educators is a direct outcome of the data-driven classroom and the quest for accountability. Key characteristics include real-time updates, quality data in and out, educator and school control of the data, and flexibility in reporting. Teacher. Classroom facilitator.

Data 52

How To Design A 21st Century Assessment

TeachThought - Learn better.

Contemporary curriculum design involves multiple facets: engaging 21st Century skills, using digital tools, collaborating with others around the globe, performance tasks, and more. In a nutshell, those considerations include: Students must demonstrate what they’ve learned.