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Blended Learning: What It Is and What It Is Not

Catlin Tucker

The pandemic has elevated the phrase “blended learning.” ” When schools closed or shifted to hybrid schedules, many institutions turned to blended learning to navigate the new demands placed on teachers and educational institutions.

Defining personalized learning and blended learning: Is there a difference?

The Christensen Institute

Recently, more than a few education headlines have focused on the concerns surrounding the shaky meaning of personalized learning, oftentimes highlighting the anxieties posed by critics that personalized means the use of technology at the expense of student’s social-emotional development or that personalization is the agenda of Silicon Valley titans. Larry Cuban’s look at an array of personalized approaches demonstrates this tendency.

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4 tips for developing effective professional development for blended learning

The Christensen Institute

With the growing prevalence of blended learning in classrooms across the country, the need for teacher training for effective implementation is more critical than ever. In order to better understand the skills and training required to implement blended learning effectively, I conducted a three-year doctoral research study at three public school sites in Los Angeles. Allow teachers to experience blended learning as a learner.

What lessons does special education hold for personalized learning?

The Hechinger Report

On a shelf in her Chicago classroom, third grader Arianna has a thick binder that details her achievements, strengths and goals as a student, along with some revealing information about her personality. Chicago has embraced personalized learning in a big way.

Blended learning up close—really close

The Christensen Institute

Next-gen learning has fallen into this trap. Particularly as EdTech penetrates schools nationwide, we often speak to technology’s enormous potential to drive new frontiers in instruction and afford ambitious design choices. But to date, there is little data that captures the intricate, hidden details like the photograph above—data on the actual day-to-day tactics unfolding in blended-learning schools across the country.

Competency-based and blended learning: Friends or foes?

The Christensen Institute

Last week, I presented a webinar for the Michigan-based EdTech Specialists’ webinar series on blended learning and competency-based education. The presentation provided me with a chance to revisit a blog post I wrote two years ago on the overlap—or lack thereof—between competency-based and blended approaches to teaching and learning. Early on, as many in the field do, the overlap of blended and competency-based learning felt obvious to me.

Blended learning enables meaningful personal interaction

The Christensen Institute

Conversations around blended learning often focus on devices, software, and classroom layouts, but some of the most powerful benefits of blended learning are the ways in which it allows teachers to have richer and more meaningful interactions with students, parents, and colleagues. Sean explains how blended learning has allowed him to be more in touch with his students and to collaborate with his colleagues.

Are you really personalizing learning?

The Christensen Institute

In a recent post , we shed light on the difference between blended learning—an instructional modality that describes integrating technology to deliver some content—and personalized learning—a philosophy that believes in a combination of modalities and goals for better and (and in some cases, new) outcomes for students. Across the K–12 education landscape, teachers have by far the biggest impact on student learning and student experiences.

One major barrier to high-quality blended learning

The Christensen Institute

Today in 2019, blended learning isn’t a new phenomenon. First, the good news: During the nine years since the Institute’s first blended learning report , we’ve seen an increasing number of schools adopt blended learning, iterate on their practices, codify what works, and share their strategies. During that same time, we’ve also seen gradual improvements in the devices, software, and online learning resources that educators use to support blended learning.

Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Online Learning

Shake Up Learning

The post Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Online Learning appeared first on Shake Up Learning. It’s time to chat about Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Online Learning! Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Online Learning – Strategies and tools to help teachers!

Will blended learning fulfill its disruptive potential?

The Christensen Institute

Given this history, could blended learning be just the latest educational fad to follow this same pattern? During the last decade, we’ve documented how online learning—often in the form of blended learning —is an innovation with disruptive potential to transform our antiquated, seat-time-based education system. But as adoption of online learning grows, there is still a cautionary tale to be told. Hiring blended learning for the wrong jobs.

Is blended learning really “the best of both worlds”?

The Christensen Institute

You’ve likely heard the declaration that blended learning combines the best of online learning and face-to-face instruction, or simply, is “the best of both worlds.” A quick Google search of the phrase pulls up numerous examples, including “[b]lended learning programs truly are the best of both worlds for students, instructors and the institution” and “[b]lended learning combines the best of traditional, face-to-face teaching with online instruction.”.

Personalized learning in the context of a person, not a school

The Christensen Institute

Personalized learning is the current big buzz in education. Everyone is trying to figure out how best to personalize the learning experience for each and every child. Like many others, I think customizing learning more deeply to match students’ interests, needs, and aspirations is what we should be doing to prepare today’s children for success in an ever-shifting, technology-fueled society and workplace.

The secret element in blended learning

The Christensen Institute

By definition , online learning is part of any blended learning classroom. It is the key innovation for enabling student-centered learning at scale. Given this fact, it’s easy to get caught up in thinking of technology—devices and software—as blended learnings’ core, defining feature. The most important element in blended learning is one that’s been in classrooms for centuries. Technology with learning needs students – 0.57.

6 tips from personalized learning innovators leading change

The Christensen Institute

Earlier this year, the Rhode Island-based Highlander Institute and the Clayton Christensen Institute teamed up to bring together a conference on blended and personalized learning in Providence, R.I. The goal of the event was to focus on the practical elements of blended and personalized learning by surfacing the tactics that practitioners were deploying in the trenches. Click here to learn more.

5 blended-learning myths to bust in 2019

The Christensen Institute

In February 2016, the Christensen Institute debuted the Blended Learning Universe (BLU)—an online hub of blended learning resources—in response to more and more schools across the U.S. implementing a blended-learning strategy for students. Lab Rotation: The online learning station occurs in a dedicated computer lab. A La Carte: Students take an online course or courses with online teachers in addition to other face-to-face courses.

How we improved our blended-learning program

eSchool News

Ubiquitous access to technology means that acquiring knowledge is no longer dependent solely on a classroom teacher. Access to unlimited new information has created seemingly contradictory qualities in today’s students—more self-reliant and independent, but with a preference toward collaborative learning environments and comfortable learning with other students. Today’s students believe technology should be seamlessly connected to their academic experiences.

Tackle teacher shortages with online learning

The Christensen Institute

As we’ve written before , one affordable and flexible solution stands out: online and blended learning hold the potential to unlock new solutions to the nation’s teacher capacity challenges. Online offerings could hold the key to disrupting the nation’s antiquated teacher recruitment and retention strategies. For this to happen, policymakers and leaders will need to recognize online learning’s potential and to legislate and plan accordingly.

Is Blended Learning the Same as Technology-Rich Instruction?

FuelEd

Contributor: Amanda Cunningham Thursday, January 28, 2016 - 10:45am There’s a lot of confusion around blended learning and technology-rich instruction. Many schools think that because they use computers in the classroom they are a blended school. Yet, “blended learning” and “technology-rich instruction” mean something quite different. .

Julie Young returns to online learning

The Christensen Institute

When Julie Young stepped down from the helm of Florida Virtual School (FLVS) after 17 years, I wrote at the end of my piece reflecting on what her contributions had meant that I wouldn’t be surprised to see Julie “continue to play a leadership role in transforming schooling to put students at the center of their learning. accredited high school through virtual learning. And, just as at FLVS, students will be able to move at their own pace and learn from anywhere at any time.

3 tips for a better student online learning experience

The Christensen Institute

million public school students attending at least 64,000 schools have seen their education interrupted; and more than 200 colleges and universities are canceling or postponing in-person classes and activities as COVID-19 enters pandemic territory. Help students own their learning.

Privacy push must not prevent personalized learning

The Christensen Institute

Education technology, however, is shifting what’s possible–and the benefits for students and teachers could be tremendous, so long as recent attempts to protect student privacy–itself an important goal–don’t get in the way. Using online learning, assessment and data analysis, we can more precisely pinpoint what students know and where they are still struggling at the moment they are struggling. We can then use that information to drive better learning.

Blended Learning Universe upgrades to drive educator learning, networking

The Christensen Institute

We live in an amazing time where school leaders have the capability to advance student-centered learning–the combination of personalizing learning and implementing competency-based learning–at scale. The engine to drive that transformation is blended learning. With the upgrade of the Blended Learning Universe (BLU) this week, educators and innovators have gained an important tool to advance this work.

Why teachers can’t deliver real personalized learning in today’s schools

The Christensen Institute

In a traditional classroom, students do not learn unless the teacher is in control by managing and guiding the learning experience, giving students directions, and making sure they all stay on task and on pace. The reality is that our traditional education system was designed to utilize teachers as lesson planners, graders, and managers of whole-group instruction, but today we also expect them to be counselors, mentors, and individual learning specialists.

How team teaching (and other innovations) can impact blended learning

eSchool News

Personalized learning’s rationale has strong intuitive appeal: We can all remember feeling bored, confused, frustrated, or lost in school when our classes didn’t spark our interests or address our learning needs. For personalized learning to actually move the needle on improving student experiences and elevating student outcomes, the question of how schools and teachers personalize is just as important as why. Is it through online learning?

Research examines blended learning, student achievement

eSchool News

A new research report from Arizona State University (ASU) focuses on various evidence-based instructional models and strategies integrated within courses from an online curriculum provider in order to determine if they lead to increased student achievement and engagement. Odysseyware aims to provide a learning solution for schools seeking the flexibility and customization of online courses, as well as for those looking to offer students a virtual learning environment.

From the classroom to the boardroom: Why teachers are essential to blended-learning design

The Christensen Institute

I recently attended the Blended and Personalized Learning Conference , which the Christensen Institute co-hosted with the Highlander Institute, to listen to school leaders from across the country discuss blended-learning implementation and best practices. To be clear, nearly every successful school and district has a principal or superintendent who exhibits strong leadership and is committed to improving student learning outcomes.

What’s the difference between blended and personalized learning?

The Christensen Institute

Earlier this month, after two exhilarating and exhausting days at the Blended and Personalized Learning Conference in Providence, R.I., which we cohosted with our partners at Highlander Institute and The Learning Accelerator), I boarded an evening flight back to D.C. Just after takeoff, a school principal from Virginia seated in the row just ahead of me poked his head through the seat to ask: “So, what’s the difference between blended and personalized learning?”.

Personalized learning and sound curriculum—two sides of the same coin

The Christensen Institute

Two weeks ago, Education Next published a blog post I wrote about the need to focus demand and funding for open educational resources (OER) on facilitating personalized learning. Fordham Institute’s Flypaper blog (which Education Next then reposted on its blog) arguing that “[a]dvocates of OER and personalized learning … tend to underestimate the breadth of knowledge necessary for true comprehension,” thereby leaving students with “a narrow and haphazard base of knowledge.”

Where blended meets personalized learning—and gets results

eSchool News

A coordinated, intentional program of blended learning is changing teaching and learning in the Nation’s capital. Public School District (DCPS) has earned a sort of celebrity status with lawmakers, superintendents, and think tank heads filing in to see what, and especially how, students are learning. Part of their success has hinged on the way teachers are using blended learning in the classroom. of Educational Technology and Library Programs.

Change education to attack technology-driven unemployment

The Christensen Institute

Fears are mounting that the rapid technological advances occurring will automate and displace jobs on a scale never before seen. In a piece for Quartz this past week, I addressed how moving to a blended learning, competency-based education system in which students advance based on mastery, not time, could address many of the concerns by better preparing citizens for the demands ahead.

Taking stock of 2017: What we learned about personalized learning

The Christensen Institute

One of the areas that has received the most attention in K-12 education, dominating headlines, conversations, and research, was personalized learning. Personalized learning remains a broad topic. But it often refers to innovative approaches to tailoring instruction to fit students’ individual needs and increase their autonomy over how, when, where, or what they learn. Online and blended learning. Personalized learning.

What’s Up with… Blended Learning?

Where Learning Clicks

Where Learning Clicks presents a new video series exploring the myriad terms, phrases, concepts and jargon of the edtech landscape. Watch our first installment to find out… What’s Up with Blended Learning? Blended learning is an instructional method that integrates the traditional classroom with innovative technology, but it’s more than just technology-rich instruction. The post What’s Up with… Blended Learning?

Stop pitting technology against quality, in-person time

The Christensen Institute

In a New York Times op-ed a couple weeks ago, Susan Pinker, the author of The Village Effect: How Face-to-Face Contact Can Make us Healthier, Happier, and Smarter , showcased the evidence that too much technology can be a bad thing, particularly for the most vulnerable students in our society. Districts tempted to start with technology for its own sake should pay heed. The point is that technology need not mean bad outcomes, but can unleash some stellar ones.

New research answers whether technology is good or bad for learning

The Christensen Institute

For years educators and scholars have debated whether technology aids learning or inhibits it. Other studies have shown similarly dismal numbers for student learning when technology is introduced in the classroom. Yet there are also bright shining stars of technology use—both in proof points and in studies, such as this Ithaka study or this U.S. As we disruptive innovation acolytes like to say, it’s almost always about the model, not the technology.