Debate on new education law overlooks future of testing

The Christensen Institute

As the House of Representatives prepares to vote tomorrow on reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)—also known since 2001 as No Child Left Behind (NCLB)—a fierce fight has continued over the proper role of testing. Seeing the rapid growth of testing in recent decades, many educators and parents are tired of tests taking time away from learning and want the federal government to push back on its prominence in schools.

A true gift from SHEG: DIY digital literacy assessments and tools for historical thinking

NeverEndingSearch

You may remember Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) for its groundbreaking and utterly depressing report, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Online Civic Reasoning. SHEG currently offers three impressive curricula that may be put to immediate use in secondary classrooms and libraries. All three are outstanding (and free), but perhaps the most immediately useful to readers of this blog is Civic Online Reasoning or COR. Beyond the Bubble History Assessments.

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The Emergency Home Learning (& More) Summit - 110 sessions + 80 replays #homelearningsummit #learningrevolution

The Learning Revolution Has Begun

Our two-month, free, online summit focused on home-based and home-centered learning officially started last week. Sessions are free to watch for five days, then become part of the Home Learning Summit library. Sign up now: [link] Whether by circumstance or choice, learning at home is now the reality for more students than ever. Understanding when, where, and how learning takes place has never been more important. Blended Learning ? Learning ?

Pearson CEO Fallon Talks Common Core, Rise of ‘Open’ Resources

Marketplace K-12

Thirty percent of the company’s revenues come from assessments of one kind or another, which includes professional certification and apprenticeship programs, as well as summative exams. The remaining 20 percent come from services provided to schools and colleges, including virtual schools, [and] online program management at universities, he said. Pearson was recently faulted by New Jersey state officials for a disruption of that state’s assessments.].