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Technology doesn’t drive blended learning success … or does it?

The Christensen Institute

Blended-learning proponents can point to a growing number of schools that consistently achieve extraordinary student learning results. But is technology the key to their success? Recently, I visited five blended-learning schools in Las Vegas and the San Jose area that are earning accolades for serving low-income and minority students and achieving strong student learning outcomes: Dr. Owen C.

Blended learning’s unfulfilled promise: Saving teachers time

The Christensen Institute

Most teachers will tell you there is never enough time in the day to do all the things they need to do. Between teaching, planning, grading, supporting out-of-class activities, and building relationships with students and their families, there never seems to be enough time to go around. Blended learning should help solve this problem. Here are a few reasons why blended learning may not live up to its time-saving potential. .

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Blended learning can enable teachers to focus on cognitive skills

The Christensen Institute

Blended learning can be a powerful tool; not only for helping teachers meet students’ individual learning needs but also helping them foster stronger relationships with students. In this post, I share excerpts from a recent interview with Megan Toyama, a blended-learning teacher who teaches AP US history and 10th-grade modern world history at Summit Tahoma, a high school that is part of the Summit Public Schools charter network in the San Francisco Bay Area.

How this state is turning its virtual teachers into online learning experts

eSchool News

In Arkansas, as in most states, student interest in online learning is skyrocketing. The state’s official response was to create a new program, called Virtual Arkansas , to manage its online courses and work with districts to find students who want to take them.

Debate on new education law overlooks future of testing

The Christensen Institute

As the House of Representatives prepares to vote tomorrow on reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)—also known since 2001 as No Child Left Behind (NCLB)—a fierce fight has continued over the proper role of testing. Seeing the rapid growth of testing in recent decades, many educators and parents are tired of tests taking time away from learning and want the federal government to push back on its prominence in schools.