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In search of on-ramps to competency-based learning

The Christensen Institute

As more and more school systems across the country explore “going competency-based,” we need to be attentive to the processes that will actually allow such innovations to thrive. Current time- and age-based accountability measures have a stronghold on schools, even those trying to break away from the factory model of education. As a result, we would predict that time-based metrics and incentives could cannibalize many efforts to reinvent learning in a competency-based manner.

Why schools are shifting to blended learning in Brazil

The Christensen Institute

For the past few years at the Institute, we’ve heard stories about Brazilian teachers trying out blended learning. To explore these trends more deeply, we published our first international blended-learning research paper in November, Blended Beyond Borders , in partnership with the WISE Initiative. Through these partners, we administered a survey to capture whether and why schools were going blended. Blended learning can give students more options.

Unlikely bedfellows converge, create inspired vision for future of education

The Christensen Institute

From the right to the left, from those who support school choice to those who have sought to protect traditional school districts, from superintendents and principals to the presidents of the two major teachers unions, and from industry leaders to researchers, a diverse group of unlikely bedfellows released on Tuesday a new effort and accompanying report to rethink education in America titled Education Reimagined: A transformational vision for education in the U.S.

Four Ways to Redefine Parent Teacher Conferences—With a Little Help from Ironman

Edsurge

As a former New York City high school teacher, I know that parent-teacher conferences seldom provide parents with enough time to process what their children learned, what they’re interested in, and what needs improvement. These conferences are rarely original and are often a missed opportunity to truly connect with parents about something beyond the report card. Talk about what's being learned, not what's missing. Of course, I replaced names with ID numbers).

The next-gen high school to watch

The Christensen Institute

Last month, the Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS) in New Hampshire launched a new set of pathways for students. These allow students to move through learning at a more flexible pace, on an as-needed basis.

What do at-risk students, English language learners and adult college students have in common?

The Hechinger Report

The New York Times has a new education supplement, called Learning, and The Hechinger Report is collaborating with the Times to produce Bulletin Board, a collection of noteworthy ideas and trends in education that will appear on page 2 of the section, which will come out four times a year.

The Trends and Challenges Shaping Technology Adoption In Schools

MindShift

We’re hoping you don’t see the report as something you read once and file away, but that you start using it to really start stimulating conversation.”. NMC/CoSN Horizons Report: K-12 Edition). Teachers are becoming more comfortable with this idea of “blending learning.”.

Will “school choice on steroids” get a boost under a Trump administration?

The Hechinger Report

The logical extension of such policies – permitting students to take individual courses wherever they wish, by using online options – has already begun to take root in about a dozen states. It’s called “Course Access” or “Course Choice.” They want them at school learning.

A school where you can’t fail — it just takes you longer to learn

The Hechinger Report

The only goal is to learn the material, sooner or later. They get frequent updates on which skills they’ve learned and which ones they need to acquire. Mastery-based learning, also known as proficiency-based or competency-based learning, is taking hold across the country.

Has New Hampshire found the secret to online education that works?

The Hechinger Report

In January 2015, Duggan enrolled in New Hampshire’s self-paced Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS), joining about 200 full-time middle and high school students and about 10,000 part-timers from brick-and-mortar schools statewide who take VLACS courses a la carte.