Blended Learning – How to Make it Work in the Classroom.

EdTech4Beginners

In spite of the fact that online education has been massively developing over the last decade, we cannot deny the fact that the majority of teaching still takes place in a traditional classroom. As you see, the blending learning has a bunch of benefits, but only when it is applied wisely.

Why new technologies often don’t help students

The Christensen Institute

Edtech enthusiasts promote the benefits of innovations such as open educational resources (OER), learning management systems (LMS), and adaptive learning software. The Gooru software and LPS’s learning resources are available for free at gooru.org.

How two CEOs created a shared language for innovation

The Christensen Institute

But one of Waters’ key breakthroughs has been learning how to not go it alone—a collaboration lesson for leaders across all industries to innovate successfully. Embrace what you don’t know and be open to learning from those outside of your traditional teams.

How should quality assurance for competency-based ed work?

The Christensen Institute

As online, competency-based learning gains steam in higher education, a critical question is emerging. Whenever a disruptive innovation emerges—and online, competency-based learning deployed in the right business model is a disruptive innovation—it doesn’t look as good as existing services according to the old metrics of performance. For online, competency-based programs, the old metrics are those focused on inputs.

A true gift from SHEG: DIY digital literacy assessments and tools for historical thinking

NeverEndingSearch

You may remember Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) for its groundbreaking and utterly depressing report, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Online Civic Reasoning. These tasks are perfect for learning across the curriculum and especially for librarian-led learning.

The persistence of distance (learning)

Learning with 'e's

In a formal sense, distance learning has been a familiar concept since at least 1837, when Sir Isaac Pitman began teaching his shorthand system using typed instruction cards mailed through the universal Penny Postal service to his students across England.