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Movie magic could be used to translate for the deaf

The Hechinger Report

Matt Huenerfauth (right), director of the Linguistic and Assistive Technologies Laboratory at the Rochester Institute of Technology, records video and motion-capture data from someone performing American Sign Language (ASL). The technology behind the cooking rats in “Ratatouille” and the dancing penguins in “Happy Feet” could help bridge stubborn academic gaps between deaf and hearing students. That reading deficit slows their learning in every other subject.

Georgia program for children with disabilities: ‘Separate and unequal’ education?

The Hechinger Report

Ten years later, the couple sat across a wooden table from Caleb, now 16, a high school dropout and, as of September, survivor of a suicide attempt. Not only did Caleb never return to his local school, but he learned little throughout his elementary, middle and high school years — which included hundreds of hours struggling through computer lessons in math, science and social studies. Related: Learning technology once reserved for special needs students is now in everyone’s hands.