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Movie magic could be used to translate for the deaf

The Hechinger Report

Matt Huenerfauth (right), director of the Linguistic and Assistive Technologies Laboratory at the Rochester Institute of Technology, records video and motion-capture data from someone performing American Sign Language (ASL). The technology behind the cooking rats in “Ratatouille” and the dancing penguins in “Happy Feet” could help bridge stubborn academic gaps between deaf and hearing students. That reading deficit slows their learning in every other subject.

Learning technology once reserved for special needs students is now in everyone’s hands. Can teachers figure out how best to use it?

The Hechinger Report

“A lot of people worry that technology will take the place of the teacher, but I think it’s exactly the opposite,” said math teacher Kaswell. This is a list of kids I need to check in with, maybe because they’re learning the English language, or because I’ve observed something where they need a little more help,” Kaswell said. Kaswell’s class is known as the STEAM lab, for science, technology, engineering, arts and math. Sign up for our Blended Learning newsletter.

Georgia program for children with disabilities: ‘Separate and unequal’ education?

The Hechinger Report

Not only did Caleb never return to his local school, but he learned little throughout his elementary, middle and high school years — which included hundreds of hours struggling through computer lessons in math, science and social studies. They are often placed in separate classrooms within public schools and spend large numbers of hours on computers using technology that is not aligned with their specific needs. At school, he uses an online program called MobyMax.