Regulatory noise stifles, slows rise of competency-based learning

The Christensen Institute

Earlier this month, Inside Higher Ed reported on how the Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General is stymying the rise of competency-based learning in higher education—and is at odds with the rest of the Department, which has been enthusiastic about competency-based learning’s potential. For online, competency-based programs, the old metrics are those focused on inputs. This post was first published on CompetencyWorks.

The liberal arts have a bright future in competency-based learning

The Christensen Institute

Although competency-based learning in higher education is arising based on the need for more affordable programs that prepare students for the workforce, by no means is competency-based learning inherently synonymous with the demise of the liberal arts. Second, online, competency-based programs don’t have to be about training students for a specific job; they can offer a more general liberal-arts program.

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Utah and Florida sign bills to support competency-based learning pilots, but now the real work begins

The Christensen Institute

This month, governors in Utah and Florida signed bills supporting the creation of competency-based education pilot programs in districts and schools. Utah’s bill, SB 143 , creates the Competency-Based Education Grants Program, which allows local education agencies to apply for grants to pilot competency-based education programs. Treat competency-based learning as a whole-system—rather than one-off—reform.

4 Digital learning trends for Higher Education

Neo LMS

Higher Education (HE) has significantly lagged behind other industries on the road to digitization. Despite the growing demand for edtech and online learning, face-to-face lectures and on-campus activities remained the core part of how students accessed their education.

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Inputs do not guarantee outcomes: Getting online credit recovery right

The Christensen Institute

In a recent editorial , the Los Angeles Times called into question the district’s record-high 75 percent graduation rate, as it said that the figure was based in part on LA Unified’s dependence on its less-than-rigorous online credit-recovery courses. Actual learning—not a piece of paper—should be the goal for every student. With rigorous, competency-based learning, effort is all but guaranteed since students must keep working until they truly master material.

Unlikely bedfellows converge, create inspired vision for future of education

The Christensen Institute

Not only are we tired of the same recurring debates about what is wrong with today’s education system and who is to blame for its inadequacies, but we also realize that no amount of tweaking or modifying the current, industrial-era system will fulfill our vision of all children learning and thriving to their full potential.”. Conversely, the Internet revolution has created a once-in-a-generation opportunity for new approaches to learning.”.

How should quality assurance for competency-based ed work?

The Christensen Institute

As online, competency-based learning gains steam in higher education, a critical question is emerging. If the federal government will fund competency-based programs through Title IV dollars, how should it think about regulating these programs? For online, competency-based programs, the old metrics are those focused on inputs. As competency-based programs emerge, we have little experience regulating them outside of the current constraints.

INTERVIEW: Digital learning trends that are reshaping EdTech

Neo LMS

Graham Glass, CEO of CYPHER LEARNING, participated to a live event for Digital Learning Day 2019. The event was hosted by Phill Bevan, Community Advisor at VETR , a digital learning community for the Australian vocational education and training sector. Phill and Graham had a wonderful conversation on the topic of e-learning and explored six key digital learning trends that are reshaping the EdTech landscape. Video learning and microlearning.

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Competency-based legal education

The Christensen Institute

In thinking about how best to prepare for that changing world, law schools need to consider how competency-based educational models can be employed to advance educational objectives for students seeking to enter the market for legal services. In this new environment, law schools need to reimagine themselves as educators for students interested in learning about the legal services sector, not simply those seeking a JD.

Government accountability goes unaccountable: Chilling WGU’s innovation engine

The Christensen Institute

governors, WGU is an online institution that uses a competency-based model. In competency-based learning, students make progress in their coursework as they master learning objectives, as opposed to a traditional credit-hour model in which students advance based on time regardless of how well they understand something.

Don’t Teach Grit. Embed It.

Edsurge

But what has been left unsaid is how our current system of education works systematically against instilling these skills in students, and how we could naturally embed the development of grit in students—in a way that doesn’t talk explicitly about grit—by moving to a competency-based learning system. In today’s system, time is held as a constant and each student’s learning is variable. As a result, they develop major holes in their learning.

Activate Instruction migrates content to Gooru

eSchool News

As the public education system evolves toward supporting students’ personalized needs, online learning tools have emerged that allow teachers to customize instruction. Every student is unique and learns differently. Gooru’s enhanced, free K-12 content will support a variety of innovative educational models and facilitate the growth of competency-based learning.”. Digital Learning and Tools News Online Learning Top News

Learning Impact Conference Report: How Can We Create More Seamless Digital Ecosystems?

techlearning

At the IMS Global Learning Impact conference this week (#LILI2018), there were dozens of sessions covering the many ways interoperability is helping data play well together to create more user-friendly digital ecosystems. Some sessions dove into the weeds, exploring systems like IMS CASE (Competencies & Academic Standards Exchange), which supports learning standards and competencies, digital resources, and assessments.

Interoperability Boosts the Speed of School Communications

EdTech Magazine

As K–12 institutions digitally progress, slow data sharing between parents, teachers and administrators is leaving all players increasingly frustrated as they are forced to wait for important information sent through what is quickly becoming an outdated system. Previously signed into law , Utah’s school system now requires all students be assigned “ digital backpacks ,” which contain a history of student data, including everything from science projects to test results. .

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WHAT’S NEW: NEW TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS

techlearning

www.getalma.com ) Alma Technologies has announced it is allowing any SQL-based business intelligence tool, such as Tableau and Jaspersoft, to access data from its modern, student information system and learning management system. BLACKBOARD ALLY ( www.blackboard.com ) Blackboard announced that Blackboard Ally is now available for multiple learning management systems used by K-12 school districts. Software & Online ALMA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

The implication, according to one NYT article : “the digital gap between rich and poor kids is not what we expected.” The real digital divide, this article contends, is not that affluent children have access to better and faster technologies. (Um,

Texas districts are rethinking technology integrations

The Christensen Institute

These 75 organizations first confronted the puzzle together last summer, when Raise Your Hand Texas, a privately funded organization that advocates for public schools, invited all 1,200 Texas districts to compete for five opportunities to receive up to $500,000 each and intensive technical assistance to implement blended learning. In the fall, the 75 teams that demonstrated the most interest and readiness met together to begin to draft their blended-learning plans.